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Pastor Scott Markle

Independent Fundamental Baptist
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Pastor Scott Markle last won the day on April 18

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About Pastor Scott Markle

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    Abiding in Christ
  • Birthday 08/13/1971

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    http://www.shepherdingtheflock.com

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    Male
  • Location:
    Melvin, MI
  • Are you IFB?
    Yes

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  • Bio
    My name is Scott Markle, and I have served the Lord my God and Savior in pastoral ministry since 1992. I have served as the pastor of Melvin Baptist Church, a small country church in the Thumb area of Michigan, since 1998. I have been joyfully married to my beloved wife Kerry since 1993; and we have been blessed of the Lord with two sons, Padraic and Westley.

    My life-verses are Philippians 3:8 and John 15:4-5. "Yea, doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ." "Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine: no more can ye except ye abide in me. I am the vine, ye are the branches. He that abideth in, and I in him, the same bringeth much fruit: for without me ye can do nothing." The burden of my life is to pursue "the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord" and to walk daily abiding in Christ, and Christ in me.

    Concerning all my ministry, it is the burden of my heart to exalt, not myself, but the name of Jesus Christ and the truth of God's Word. It is my burden that Christ must increase, while I must decrease. Therefore, I maintain the policy that my name, as the author of a book, must remain smaller, while the phrase, "For the Glory of the Lord," must stand larger above it. Thus far the Lord our God has graciously allowed me to self-publish three books and a three booklets, as well as to produce a line of Scripture memory cards, which all can be purchased at my website: www.shepherdingtheflock.com. In addition, I maintain a monthly Bible study blog at that website.

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  1. Saved in 3 tenses?

    Concerning the Parable of the Prodigal Son & the Older Brother (Part 3 of 3) It is possible to consider and apply the truth of this parable as a singular unit of its own, and thereby to separate it from the context of Luke 15 as a whole. In such a case, an individual could focus upon the father-son relationship that is presented within the parable, and could view the parable as speaking concerning the relationship of God the Father with His dear children, that is – with those who are His children through faith in Christ. Even so, the prodigal son would then be viewed as representing believers who go away backward from the Lord our God through a complete lifestyle of worldliness; whereas the older brother would then be viewed as representing believers who go away backward from the Lord our God in heart attitude while maintaining faithfulness in religious practice. In addition, the primary truth of the parable would be that there is a way of spiritual return and revival through repentance for backslidden believers, and that such repentance is required equally for both a lifestyle of utter worldliness and an attitude of selfish hypocrisy. Yet within this consideration and application of the parable, the question might arise how a genuine child of God might be “dead and then alive again” and might be “lost and then found,” as per Luke 15:24, 32. First, it is important for us to recognize that these statements are made as figurative statements by the father himself within the parable. So then, we may ask – In what way was the prodigal “dead” and “lost” to his father? Certainly it was not because the prodigal had physically died or necessarily because the father had no idea where his son had gone. Rather, it was because their relationship of fellowship was broken (“dead” and “lost” to the father) when the prodigal departed to the far country. Second, we must understand the essential meaning of “death” as presented through God’s Word. We ourselves have the tendency to think of “death” as a cessation. The lungs cease breathing. The heart ceases pumping. The brain ceases processing. The body ceases functioning. The person ceases living. Yet God’s Word does not present “death” essentially as a cessation, but more so as a separation. While physical death does mean that the person ceases living in this life, it does not mean that the person ceases living and existing altogether; for the person in the form of soul-spirit continues to “live” and exist in the life to come. Thus God’s Word defines physical death as the moment when the soul-spirit separates from the physical body. This principle of separation also defines the second death, the lake of fire. (See Revelation 2:11; 20:6, 14; 21:8) The second death is eternal death. It is not a complete and eternal separation from God altogether, for God Himself IS present in the lake of fire. First, the Lord our God is infinitely present, and thus present even in the lake of fire. Second, the lake of fire is a part of creation, “prepared for the devil and his angels” (see Matthew 25:41); and as the One who sustains all creation, the Lord our God is present to sustain the eternal existence of the lake of fire. Third, the lake of fire is the place wherein the Lord God’s infinite wrath is “poured out without mixture” (see Revelation 14:10-11) and thus the Lord our God is present there in the eternal outpouring of His wrath. So then, in what manner is the lake of fire a separation? When Revelation 14:10 indicates that God’s wrath is poured out in the lake of fire “without mixture,” it means that His infinite wrath is not at all in even the smallest manner diluted by God’s goodness, grace, mercy, love, kindness. This is the eternal separation of the second death, the lake of fire – a complete and eternal separation from any experience whatsoever at all in God’s goodness, grace, mercy, love, and kindness. This principle of separation also defines the spiritually lost condition of the unsaved, who are “dead in trespasses and sins.” (See Ephesians 2:1) This means that they are the children of sinful disobedience and spiritual darkness (see Ephesians 2:2, 5:8), being separate from the family of God. This means that they are without Christ as their Savior, without hope of a heavenly home, and without God as their heavenly Father. (See Ephesians 2:12) This means that they are completely separated “from the life of God” through the spiritual blindness of their hearts. (see Ephesians 4:18) Their spirit is dead. This does not mean that their spirit is non-existent. Rather, this means that on the level of their spirit, they are completely dead to God in sin. They are completely separated from any spiritual ability to have spiritual fellowship with God the Father. So then, is there a Biblical manner in which the children of God might experience spiritual deadness? Speaking to the children of God, Romans 8:12-13 gives answer, “Therefore, brethren, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live after the flesh. For if ye live after the flesh, ye shall die: but if ye through the Spirit do mortify the deeds of the body, ye shall live.” At the moment of faith in Christ for salvation, a believer is regenerated at the level of the spirit. The old spirit, that was spiritually dead to God and completely “corrupt according to the deceitful lusts” (see Ephesians 4:22), is crucified with Christ and removed; and a new spirit, “which after God is created in righteousness and true holiness” (see Ephesians 4:24) replaces that old spirit. Even so, at the level of the spirit, the believer is a new creation in Christ Jesus, such that the old spirit is completely passed away, and the believer’s spirit is completely made new. (See 2 Corinthians 5:17) Yet while living upon this earth, the believer still retains his or her sinful flesh, the principle of selfishness within the believer’s soul. (See Romans 7:17-18, 23) Thus every single moment of this life a war rages within the believer’s soul. This war rages between the believer’s regenerated spirit in union with the indwelling Holy Spirit and the believer’s sinful, selfish flesh. (See Galatians 5:17) Indeed, this war rages over controlling influence upon the believer’s soul, encompassing the motivations of the believer’s heart, the thoughts of the believer’s mind, the feelings of the believer’s emotion, and the decisions of the believer’s will. (See 1Peter 2:11) Even so, when a believer walks after the influence of his or her sinful, selfish flesh, that believer experiences a spiritual deadness in his or her daily walk. (See Romans 8:13) On the other hand, when a believer walks after the influence of the indwelling Holy Spirit, that believer experiences abundant spiritual life in his or her daily walk. (See Romans 8:13) However, the spiritual deadness that a believer experiences when walking after the influence his or her sinful, selfish flesh is not on the level of the believer’s spirit, but is only on the level of the believer’s soul. The believer’s regenerate spirit is created after God’s own likeness in perfect righteousness and holiness, whereby the believer is a partaker of the divine nature. (See Ephesians 4:24 & 2 Peter 1:4) In addition, the believer’s spirit is indwelt by God the Holy Spirit. (See Romans 8:16) This regenerated spirit cannot be corrupted by sin, and thus cannot experience spiritual deadness. However, the believer’s soul still needs to be transformed unto the perfect character of Christ through the process of sanctification. (See Romans 12:2 & 2 Corinthians 3:18) Thus the believer CAN experience sinful corruption in the character of the soul and CAN experience spiritual deadness at the level of the soul. This spiritual deadness would be defined as a separation from the moment-by-moment fellowship of God at the level of the believer’s soul. (See 1 John 1:6) Indeed in the realm of a believer’s daily walk, that believer could become “dead” and “lost” to the fellowship of God the Father. Yet there is a way back to the fullness and abundance of God’s blessed fellowship. That way back is by means of broken hearted repentance. Even so, the parable of the prodigal son and the older brother could be viewed and applied in order to communicate this principle of repentance. In conclusion, I would list the four realms of “death” as follows: 1. Physical Death – impacting an individual’s physical life upon this earth, being the separation of the soul-spirit from the body. 2. Eternal Death (the second death) – impacting an individual’s whole person for eternity, being the separation of the individuals from any part in God’s goodness, grace, mercy, love, kindness, so as only to experience the judgment of God’s infinite wrath forever. 3. Spiritual Death – impacting an unbeliever’s spirit (and thereby also the individual’s soul), being the complete separation of the individual’s spirit from the life, family, and fellowship of God, so as to be the children of sinful disobedience and spiritual darkness. 4. Soulish Death – impacting a believer’s soul (but not the believer’s spirit), being a separation from the blessed and abundant fellowship of God in the believer’s daily walk (but not a separation from the believer’s family relationship with God). It is worthy to notice that in every one of these cases, the foundational cause for the “death” element is sin. Even so, James 1:15 declares, “Then when lust hath conceived, it bringeth for sin: and sin, when it is finished, bringeth forth death.” This principle is a spiritually universal principle that affects both believers and unbelievers. In fact, in its context James 1:15 was written to believers concerning their daily spiritual walk.
  2. When Did Jesus Die

    Then, Brother "Swathdiver," you will be compelled to view my position on the entire matter as wrong also. In response, I would ask you the following questions: 1. Can you provide a single verse of the New Testament wherein the word "early" is clearly used for the evening hours of the day? 2. According to your position, what all precisely would be encompassed as the third day since (after) the crucifixion? 3. According to your position, when precisely did the third day since (after) the crucifixion end? 4. According to your position, what all precisely would be encompassed as the fourth day since (after) the crucifixion?
  3. When Did Jesus Die

    Actually, the problem is even bigger than that; for in Luke 24:20-21 the two disciples on the road to Emmaus stated, "And how the chief priests and our rulers delivered him to be condemned to death, and have crucified him. But we trusted that it had been he which should have redeemed Israel: and beside all this, to day is the third day since these things were done." Now, their communication with our Lord Jesus Christ as they journeyed to Emmaus occurred during the afternoon on Sunday. Thus the entirety of Sunday, including the afternoon thereof, has to be recognized as the THIRD DAY (not the fourth day) since (from, after) the crucifixion. From my perspective, it is numerically impossible for the entirety of Sunday to be the THIRD DAY since (from, after) the crucifixion if our Lord Jesus Christ was crucified on Wednesday. (Note: It is an interesting fact that the truth that our Lord Jesus Christ was resurrected "the third day" (see Matthew 16:21; 20:18-19; Mark 9:31; 10:33-34; Luke 9:22; 18:31-33; 24:6-7; 24:20-21; 24:46; Acts 10:40; 1 Corinthians 15:3-4) is presented in the New Testament almost twice as often as a reference to the truth that His resurrection and the events related to the resurrection were "the first day of the week" (Matthew 28:1; Mark 16:2; 16:9; Luke 24:1; John 20:1; 20:19). I wonder then if one of these two truths is more significant than the other in relation to the timing of our Lord Jesus Christ's resurrection?)
  4. When Did Jesus Die

    No I do NOT. As I have presented earlier in this thread discussion (here), I cannot find a single occasion in the New Testament wherein the word "early" (and the Greek word from which it is translated in Mark 16:9) is used for the evening hours of a day, but can ONLY find that when the word is used in the New Testament for the time of a day, it is ALWAYS used for the MORNING hours of the day. (Note: I DO acknowledge that the Jewish 24 hour day began at 6pm of what we would consider the previous day, so that their viewpoint of a day began with the first watch of the evening, ran through the four watches of the night, and then extended from morning to evening.)
  5. When Did Jesus Die

    The Scriptures themselves teach that our Lord Jesus Christ was resurrected the first day of the week, which was Sunday. Furthermore, the Scriptures themselves teach that the day on which our Lord Jesus Christ was resurrected, that is -- Sunday, was itself the third day since (from, after) His crucifixion (NOT the fourth day since). Finally, the Scriptures themselves teach that our Lord Jesus Christ was resurrected early in the morning hours on the first day of the week (Sunday). Even so, I am compelled to reject as incorrect any position that contradicts these specific points of Scripture. I would agree that Mary Magdalene came to the tomb twice, the first time with the other women and the second time alone. On the other hand, I am not aware of any indication that Peter went to the tomb itself more than once.
  6. Addition to the rules and regs?

    Sister Salyan, I have no dispute with these concerns at all. Above I shared my own information by my own free choice, to some extent since all of the information is already online through my two public websites. Brother Dave, I certainly understand that position as well. In my case, I pray that I do not come across as an "internet theologian," but as a conscientious Bible student and teacher. It is ever my desire, not to show off, but to spiritually edify.
  7. Addition to the rules and regs?

    Well, this is probably somewhat of a side note here. I enjoy teaching God's Holy Word. I believe that the Lord our God has built me to be a teacher by nature (maybe I am wrong on that, and others could reveal my error). Indeed, I enjoy (as much as time will permit) answering Biblical questions and explaining (sometimes with extensive detail, as many of you would know) Biblical truths. As such, I guess that I might be classified as a "teacher" on Online Baptist. Therefore, I publicly declare without hesitation -- Pastor Scott Markle Melvin Baptist Church 7971 Washington St. Melvin, MI 48454 (810) 378-5323 www.melvinbaptistchurch.com author of various books Self-publishing company - Shepherding the Flock Ministries www.shepherdingtheflock.com Independent Fundamental Baptist (although I may not always follow in line with the position of the Fundamentalist "movement" on some things) Independent by conviction Fundamental by conviction Baptist by conviction Holding to the King James translation, as one who is Massoretic Text and Received Text by conviction If there is anything else that would need to be known, please ask.
  8. Only Begotten Son of God?

    Brother "TRKJVlover," (if you were to provide your given name, I would use it herein out of respect) I myself hold to the position of eternal sonship for God the Son in relation to God the Father. Yet in this posting I do not intend to provide my argumentation for that position, rather I wish to ask some questions in relation to your position against it, as follows: 1. Do you believe in the tri-unity of the Godhead? 2. If you do, do you also believe that the tri-unity of the Godhead existed as a tri-unity in eternity past? 3. If you do, what was the relationship structure between the three Persons of the eternal Godhead with one another in eternity past? 4. More specifically, what was the relationship structure between God the Son and God the Father with one another in eternity past? (Thought question: From the perspective of your position, was God the Son always God the Son; or did He only become God the Son at His incarnation, such that He was God the . . . something else . . . prior to His incarnation?)
  9. Addition to the rules and regs?

    Indeed. I am not sure what the details should be, but I certainly agree with the principle.
  10. When Did Jesus Die

    Concerning my position that it was early in the morning hours of Sunday, I provide a somewhat open range (probably between 3-6 am) because "early" (in the morning) is not more precise than that. I want to be AS precise as Scripture without trying to be MORE precise than Scripture. I myself would actually lean closer toward sunrise in this estimation, although I would also lean toward the earliest moments of sunrise (whatever timing that might have been on that day).
  11. When Did Jesus Die

    Agreed somewhat. I agree that it is somewhat an academic argument. I agree that it can be a fun discussion as long as it remains civil and gracious (which should be true for us always). However, I also believe that it is as serious as that which is revealed concerning it within God's Holy Word.
  12. Saved in 3 tenses?

    Sister Rose, I do have one more installment concerning the parable of the prodigal son and the older brother. This installment will concern the applicational usage of the parable concerning the matter of spiritual revival among believers. However, in relation to the interest that you expressed above, I have a question for you -- When do you believe that eternal regeneration first began to be applied unto believers? For example, those who do not grant regeneration unto Old Testament believers often place the dividing line at the death and resurrection of our Lord Jesus Christ, indicating that regeneration is a blessing of the new covenant that began with the shed blood and sacrificial death of Christ, and that blessing of regeneration is empowered by the resurrection of Christ. Thus they would conclude that the blessing of regeneration could not has been granted before that death and resurrection. Is this the position that you hold? Or is your position something different that this? (Note: The point at which you hold for the beginning of the blessing of regeneration will affect the particular evidences that I might present to the contrary.)
  13. When Did Jesus Die

    Brother Dave, Beloved in the Lord and Friend on the Forum, I am not sure why you fear that you might offend me, no matter how vigorously you might defend your position against my own (unless you intend to say disparaging things about me personally, which I simply CANNOT image that you might do). Certainly, I would probably defend my own position against yours with the same level of fervency. However, I believe that we might be fervent in this regard, yet also remain friends. Indeed, I pray that I have not presented myself as easily offended by such fervent and vigorous discussions. ------------------------------------------------------------------- With the above in mind, I do have some questions that I had desired to present in regard to your position on this matter. If you still prefer not to answer and not to continue the discussion, I will not be offended. On the other hand, if you are willing to answer the question, they are as follows: 1. According to your position, when precisely (or at least with as much precision as you might be able to offer) was Christ resurrected? 2. According to your position, when precisely did the third day since (after) the crucifixion end? 3. According to your position, what all precisely would be encompassed as the fourth day since (after) the crucifixion? 4. As per your own question, what is the reason that you think for the women not coming to the tomb until the morning hours of Sunday?
  14. When Did Jesus Die

    Brother Jordan, I would certainly agree that this detail is not nearly as important as those of our Lord Jesus Christ's crucifixion and resurrection themselves. However, I would also contend that this detail is as important as the information whereby it is revealed in God's Holy Word. For example, above you appear to make reference unto a quotation by the apostle Paul from 1 Corinthians 15:3-4; but you also left out a detail that the apostle included under inspiration of the Holy Spirit -- "How that Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures; and that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the Scriptures." The Holy Spirit viewed that detail as important enough to include in this Scriptural declaration for some reason.
  15. When Did Jesus Die

    Every usage of the English word “early” in the King James translation of the New Testament is as follows: Matthew 20:1 – “For the kingdom of heaven is like unto a man that is an householder, which went out early in the morning to hire labourers into his vineyard.” Mark 16:2 – “And very early in the morning the first day of the week, they came unto the sepulchre at the rising of the sun.” Mark 16:9 – “Now when Jesus was risen early the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had cast seven devils.” Luke 21:38 – “And all the people came early in the morning to him in the temple, for to hear him.” Luke 24:1 – “Now upon the first day of the week, very early in the morning, they came unto the sepulchre, bringing the spices which they had prepared, and certain others with them.” Luke 24:22 – “Yea, and certain women also of our company made us astonished, which were early at the sepulcher.” John 8:2 – “And early in the morning he came again into the temple, and all the people came unto him; and he sat down, and taught them.” John 18:28 – “Then led they Jesus from Caiaphas unto the hall of judgment: and it was early; and they themselves went not into the judgment hall, lest they should be defiled; but that they might eat the passover.” John 20:1 – “The first day of the week cometh Mary Magdalene early, when it was yet dark, unto the sepulchre, and seeth the stone taken away from the sepulchre.” Acts 5:21 – “And when they heard that, they entered into the temple early in the morning, and taught. But the high priest came, and they that were with him, and called the council together, and all the senate of the children of Israel, and sent to the prison to have them brought.” James 5:7 – “Be patient therefore, brethren, unto the coming of the Lord. Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it, until he receive the early and latter rain.” Herein we notice that James 5:7 is the only passage wherein the word "early" is used for something other than a time of a day. On the other hand, every other usage wherein the word "early" is used for a time of a day, it is used for the morning hours of the day. _________________________________________ Every usage of the Greek adverb “proi” (Strong’s #4404), which is the Greek word translated with the English word “early” in Mark 16:9, is as follows: Matthew 16:3 – “And in the morning, It will be foul weather to day: for the sky is red and lowring. O ye hypocrites, ye can discern the face of the sky; but can ye not discern the signs of the times?” Matthew 20:1 – “For the kingdom of heaven is like unto a man that is an householder, which went out early in the morning to hire labourers into his vineyard.” Mark 1:35 – “And in the morning, rising up a great while before day, he went out, and departed into a solitary place, and there prayed.” Mark 11:20 – “And in the morning, as they passed by, they saw the fig tree dried up from the roots.” Mark 13:35 – “Watch ye therefore: for ye know not when the master of the house cometh, at even, or at midnight, or at the cockcrowing, or in the morning.” Mark 15:1 – “And straightway in the morning the chief priests held a consultation with the elders and scribes and the whole council, and bound Jesus, and carried him away, and delivered him to Pilate.” Mark 16:2 – “And very early in the morning the first day of the week, they came unto the sepulchre at the rising of the sun.” Mark 16:9 – “Now when Jesus was risen early the first day of the week, he appeared first to Mary Magdalene, out of whom he had cast seven devils.” John 20:1 – “The first day of the week cometh Mary Magdalene early, when it was yet dark, unto the sepulchre, and seeth the stone taken away from the sepulchre.” Acts 28:23 – “And when they had appointed him a day, there came many to him into his lodging; to whom he expounded and testified the kingdom of God, persuading them concerning Jesus, both out of the law of Moses, and out of the prophets, from morning till evening.” Herein we notice that every usage concerns the time of a day, and in particular it refers unto the morning hours of the day. It might be noticed that in a few of these passages this word is joined with other time designations, as follows: 1. in Mark 1:35 this word is joined with the time descriptive, "a great while before day." 2. In Mark 13:35 this word is placed in contrast with the time descriptive, "at even, or at midnight, or at the cockcrowing, or . . ." 3. In Mark 16:2 this word is joined with the time descriptive, "at the rising of the sun." 4. In John 20:1 this word is joined with the time descriptive, "when it was yet dark." 5. In Acts 28:23 this word is placed in contrast with the time descriptive, "from . . . till evening." As such, we might understand that this word does not include evening, midnight, or the time of the cockcrowing in its definition, but that it can include "a great while" before the precise beginning of the day, while it might still be dark, yet close to the time for the rising of the sun. For this reason I have estimated that our Lord Jesus Christ rose in early morning hours on Sunday, probably between 3-6 am, although I would lean toward the thought that it was closer to 6 am than to 3 am.
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