Pastor Scott Markle

*Independent Fundamental Baptist
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About Pastor Scott Markle

  • Rank
    Abiding in Christ
  • Birthday 08/13/1971

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    http://www.shepherdingtheflock.com

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    Male
  • Location:
    Melvin, MI
  • Are you IFB?
    Yes

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  • Bio
    My name is Scott Markle, and I have served the Lord my God and Savior in pastoral ministry since 1992. I have served as the pastor of Melvin Baptist Church, a small country church in the Thumb area of Michigan, since 1998. I have been joyfully married to my beloved wife Kerry since 1993; and we have been blessed of the Lord with two sons, Padraic and Westley.

    My life-verses are Philippians 3:8 and John 15:4-5. "Yea, doubtless, and I count all things but loss for the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord: for whom I have suffered the loss of all things, and do count them but dung, that I may win Christ." "Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine: no more can ye except ye abide in me. I am the vine, ye are the branches. He that abideth in, and I in him, the same bringeth much fruit: for without me ye can do nothing." The burden of my life is to pursue "the excellency of the knowledge of Christ Jesus my Lord" and to walk daily abiding in Christ, and Christ in me.

    Concerning all my ministry, it is the burden of my heart to exalt, not myself, but the name of Jesus Christ and the truth of God's Word. It is my burden that Christ must increase, while I must decrease. Therefore, I maintain the policy that my name, as the author of a book, must remain smaller, while the phrase, "For the Glory of the Lord," must stand larger above it. Thus far the Lord our God has graciously allowed me to self-publish three books and a three booklets, as well as to produce a line of Scripture memory cards, which all can be purchased at my website: www.shepherdingtheflock.com. In addition, I maintain a monthly Bible study blog at that website.

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  1. Concerning children's characteristics of disobedience -- "Give it time; they will grow out of it." Concerning marriage -- "A happy wife means a happy life." (For me this statement implies too much because it lacks the balancing truth -- "But an unhappy God means a chastened life." This is a balancing truth because sometimes a husband is required to choose BETWEEN pleasing God or pleasing his wife. This first statement implies -- "Always, always, always please your wife." The second statement implies -- "NOT SO, but always, always, ALWAYS please God, even if that means displeasing your wife." Concerning pastoral ministry -- "Do NOT get too close to anyone in the flock, because 'familiarity breeds contempt." That "familiarity breeds contempt is true as far as it goes; however, the balancing truth is that 'fellowship breeds love.' Coming out of the lost world -- "Christian's should be like Christ, and Christ was all about LOVE; He never did anything that would hurt anyone's feelings."
  2. Uhhh??? Up here in Michigan, we call that an Autumn Frost.
  3. Brother Mike, First, I am NOT at all contrary to the point which you have made from 1 Corinthians 12:28-31. However, I do wish to expand it from the very same context of 1 Corinthians 12. In 1 Corinthians 12:18 we find the following declaration -- "But now hath God set the members every one of them in the body, as it hath pleased him." Even so, we learn that it is not just the pastoral leadership whom the Lord our God has set ("called") unto their specific place within the ministry of the church, but that it is EVERY SINGLE member whom the Lord our god has set ("called") unto their specific place within the ministry of the church. Often there is talk concerning the "calling of God" upon a pastor for his place of pastoral ministry. However, I would contend that we often neglect the truth concerning the "calling of God" upon each and every member for their specific, individual place of ministry within the church body.
  4. 1. Are there any passages of Scripture which indicate that when God's people are no longer interested in the preaching/teaching of God's Word, it is the preacher's/teacher's fault? 2. Are there any passages of Scripture which indicate that when God's people are no longer interested in the preaching/teaching of God's Word, it is the people's fault? 3. Are there any passages of Scripture wherein we have an example of God's people not being interested in the preaching/teaching of God's Word, and it is attributed to the fault of the preacher/teacher? 4. Are there any passages of Scripture wherein we have an example of God's people not being interested in the preaching/teaching of God's Word, and it is attributed to the fault of the people? (Note: I now express a word of complaint -- The burden of my original posting was NOT that God's people are often not interested in more and longer preaching/teaching of God's Word. Rather, the burden of my original posting was where we claim that the fault for this lies, and whether we support our accusation from the evidence of God's Word. What I am observing in this thread discussion is that my burden is being "played out" within the thread discussion itself. Various comments have been made concerning the subject matter, but little Biblical support has been provided for those comments. So then, I present this note in order once again to provoke some BIBLICAL consideration of the matter.)
  5. "Elevators in the Life of Jonah"????? Ok, now that one was a completely new one for me. What "elevators"?
  6. Brother Dave, I give some of my "change" - Amen, and AMEN!!! 2 Timothy 4:2 -- "Preach the word; be instant in season, out of season; reprove, rebuke, exhort with all longsuffering and doctrine."
  7. So then, was the apostle Paul sinfully wrong (and thus, NOT led of the Holy spirit) in preaching/teaching for a six hour (approximately) length of time? Or, was Eutychus wrong for falling asleep? What about everyone else that was in that assembly; did a loooooong ministry of preaching/teaching result in death for them also? Or, was it spiritually profitable and edificational unto them? If the apostle Paul was wrong for his first period of looooong ministry in preaching/teaching, did he then commit an even greater wrong for talking after the resurrection of Eutychus and the breaking of bread "a long while" longer, "even till break of day" (approximately another six hours)? (By the way, Eutychus did not fall asleep and fall to his death until a period of six hours (approximately) had past. I wonder what we should think of those who fall asleep today within the first fifteen minutes?)
  8. 1. According to Hebrews 10:24-25, what is the purpose for assembling together as believers in a church service? Hebrews 10:24-25 -- "And let us consider one another to provoke unto love and to good works: not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as the manner of some is; but exhorting one another: and so much the more, as ye see the day approaching." 2. According to Ephesians 4:11-12, what is the responsibility of church leadership within the ministry of the church? Ephesians 4:11-12 -- "And he gave some, apostles; and some, prophets; and some, evangelists; and some, pastors and teachers; for the perfecting of the saints, for the work of the ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ." 3. According to Ephesians 4:13-14, what is the ultimate objective for believers' exhorting one another and for church leaderships' perfecting the saints? Ephesians 4:13-14 -- "Till we all come in the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, unto a perfect man, unto the measure of the stature of the fulness of Christ: that we henceforth be no more children, tossed to and fro, and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the sleight of men, and cunning craftiness, whereby they lie in wait to deceive." 4. According to Ephesians 4:15, what is the means by which believers may exhort one another and by which church leadership may perfect the saints? Ephesians 4:15 -- "But speaking the truth in love, may grow up into him in all things, which is the head, even Christ." 5. According to Hebrews 10:24-25, how much should we engage in assembling together as believers for such ministry activities? Hebrews 10:24-25 -- "And let us consider one another to provoke unto love and to good works: not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as the manner of some is; but exhorting one another: and so much the more, as ye see the day approaching." (Note: Please consider the authority which has been employed for this presentation.)
  9. Recently I encountered an article on the matter of sermon length that stirred my heart yet again on the matter. Often in the church culture of the U.S.A. (I do NOT speak about the church culture of other countries, since I simply do not know about them), it is argued the sermon length MUST be somewhat short, being no longer than 25-30 minutes, and rarely reaching 45 minutes. Indeed, arguments are presented such like -- if a preacher/teacher cannot say what has to be said in that amount of time, then . . . (something that implies that he is a failure as a preacher/teacher of God's Word). Indeed, arguments are presented against longer messages because of "human attention span issues" and "lack of preaching ability/eloquence issues." Yet this raises some questions within my heart -- 1. Why when such arguments for shorter preaching/teaching length are given is there very, very, very rarely (if ever) any Biblical evidence given for the arguments? 2. What is the only and final authority for how the church ministry should proceed, including the preaching/teaching length? (Obviously, God's Holy Word, right?) 3. What does God's Holy Word indicate concerning the desire of God's people for more and more of God's truth or for less and less of God's truth? 4. What does God's Holy Word provide as instruction, counsel, or example concerning the preaching/teaching length of a Bible message? 5. What does God's Holy Word indicate concerning the importance of receiving, hungering for, and pursuing after the truth and teaching of God's Word? 6. What does God's Holy Word indicate concerning the lack of attention, interest, and endurance for the truth and teaching of God's Word? 7. Why do we have a church culture that does not seem to want to ask (or, to study Scripture to answer with genuine Biblical evidence) such questions? Now, I myself DO have a fairly strong viewpoint concerning the matter. However, I do NOT know that I will comment overmuch more in this thread (because of the possible time requirement, and because I am already involved in a number of other thread discussion commitments that I am presently failing because of time restrictions). Yet I DID desire to bring forward this burden and these questions in order to provoke some Biblical consideration of the matter. Thank you for allowing me to express my burden of heart. Pastor Scott Markle
  10. For those who may be interested, I am aware that I have a number of "more intensive" forum discussions unto which I have contributed just "hanging" at present. I am writing this "note" in order to inform those who may be looking for my next contribution in one of them - I am NOT done, but just very busy at present with ministry, family, and holiday responsibilities. For me, contributing to these "more intensive" discussions requires more than just a few, quick lines. Please be patient with me. Thank you, Pastor Scott Markle
  11. Weekly Sermon Introduction: A. The Conflict 1. The publicans and sinners come Luke 15:1 – “Then drew near unto him all the publicans and sinners for to hear him.” 2. The Pharisees and scribes complain Luke 15:2 – “And the Pharisees and scribes murmured, saying, This man receiveth sinners, and eateth with them.” B. The Message 1. Rejoicing when a lost sheep is found Luke 15:3-6 – “And he spake this parable unto them, saying, What man of you, having an hundred sheep, if he lose one of them, doth not leave the ninety and nine in the wilderness, and go after that which is lost, until he find it? And when he hath found it, he layeth it on his shoulders, rejoicing. And when he cometh home, he calleth together his friends and neighbours, saying unto them, Rejoice with me; for I have found my sheep which was lost.” 2. Rejoicing when a lost coin is found Luke 15:8-9 – “Either what woman having ten pieces of silver, if she lose one piece, doth not light a candle, and sweep the house, and seek diligently till she find it? And when she hath found it, she calleth her friends and her neighbours together, saying, Rejoice with me; for I have found the piece which I had lost.” 3. Rejoicing when a lost son is returned repentant Luke 15:22-24 – “But the father said to his servants, Bring forth the best robe, and put it on him; and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet: and bring hither the fatted calf, and kill it; and let us eat, and be merry: for this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found. And they began to be merry.” 4. Rejoicing by God the Father when a sinner repents Luke 15:7 – “I say unto you, that likewise joy shall be in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, more than over ninety and nine just persons, which need no repentance.” Luke 15:10 – “Likewise, I say unto you, there is joy in the presence of the angels of God over one sinner that repenteth.” I. The Other Brother Did NOT Agree with the Father. Luke 15:24-28a – “Now his elder son was in the field: and as he came and drew nigh to the house, he heard musick and dancing. And he called one of the servants, and asked what these things meant. And he said unto him, Thy brother is come; and thy father hath killed the fatted calf, because he hath received him safe and sound. And he was angry . . . .” II. The Other Brother Became Angry with the Father. Luke 15:28-30 – “And he was angry, and would not go in: therefore came his father out, and intreated him. And he answering said to his father, Lo, these many years do I serve thee, neither transgressed I at any time thy commandment: and yet thou never gavest me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends: but as soon as this thy son was come, which hath devoured thy living with harlots, thou hast killed for him the fatted calf.” III. The Other Brother Broke Fellowship with the Father. Luke 15:28 – “And he was angry, and would not go in: therefore came his father out, and intreated him.” IV. The Other Brother Cared Only about Himself. Luke 15:29-30 – “And he answering said to his father, Lo, these many years do I serve thee, neither transgressed I at any time thy commandment: and yet thou never gavest me a kid, that I might make merry with my friends: but as soon as this thy son was come, which hath devoured thy living with harlots, thou hast killed for him the fatted calf.” V. The Other Brother Continued in Bitterness against the Father. Luke 15:31-32 – “And he said unto him, Son, thou art ever with me, and all that I have is thine. It was meet that we should make merry, and be glad: for this thy brother was dead, and is alive again; and was lost, and is found.” Note: The parable ends without any indication of repentance on the part of “the other brother.” In fact, both brothers departed from fellowship with their father. The younger son broke fellowship through a sinful lifestyle, whereas the older son broke fellowship through a sinful attitude. Furthermore, the older son engaged in a broken fellowship while never leaving the father’s house, and while having continued in outward, “religious” service and obedience to the father. Posted in Weekly Sermon, Luke, ​Delight of the Lord, Sin of Selfishness, Rebellion against God Please share this post with others: View the full article
  12. Well, I certainly do NOT know what was given in the "private message" response. On the other hand, I have noted Brother Pittman's two attempts at asking his "controversial" question. I am aware that this question originated out of contention with Brother Alan's thread discussion. I do NOT know what the position of the moderators might be concerning whether this question should be discussed. With all of that preface, in answer to Brother Pittman's question -- Although I STRONGLY hold to the pretribulational, premillennial rapture of the saints, I myself do NOT believe that the opening verses of Revelation 4 are speaking concerning that matter.
  13. Yet what about "those" passages of Scripture? (Part 1) Concerning Romans 7:8-9. Romans 7:8-9 – “But sin, taking occasion by the commandment, wrought in me all manner of concupiscence. For without the law sin was dead. For I was alive without the law once: but when the commandment came, sin revived, and I died.” Often the concluding statement of Romans 7:8 and the continuing statement of Romans 7:9 are presented as Biblical evidence that babies are NOT born already dead spiritually “in trespasses and sins” and are NOT held spiritually accountable for a beginning portion of their lives. In relating a testimony concerning his own past, the apostle Paul revealed in Romans 7:9 that there was first a time in his life when he “was alive . . . once;” and that there was sometime afterward a time when he “died.” Now, it seems quite clear from the context that the apostle was speaking about the matters of spiritual life and death. As such, the apostle was revealing that first he was spiritually alive, and that sometime afterward he spiritually died. Furthermore, the apostle revealed that his differing conditions of spiritual life and of spiritual death were directly related to his differing relationship with God’s law. First, he reveals that there was a time wherein he was “without the law once.” Even so, he reveals that when he was “without the law,” “sin was dead” in his life; and he himself “was alive” spiritually. Second, he reveals that there was a time “when the commandment” of God’s law “came” into his life. Even so, he reveals that when this happened, “sin revived” in his life; and he himself “died” spiritually. Thus we find that this passage speaks, not only about the matters of spiritual life and death, but also about spiritual accountability under God’s law and how that accountability relates to the matters of spiritual life and death. Now, it is often argued from this that there is a two-fold sequence of spiritual conditions which is revealed from this passage, as follows: 1. First, a time period of life “without the law,” when sin is “dead” in an individual’s life, and when the individual is spiritually “alive.” 2. Afterward, a time period of life “when the commandment” of the law comes, such that sin revives in and individual’s life, and such that the individual spiritually dies. As such, it is further argued from this that the first spiritual condition must be at the very beginning of an individual’s life, during the time of babyhood and early childhood. In addition, It is argued that the phrase “without the law” means that during this early time period of an individual’s life, God does not hold the individual accountable unto the commands of His law. Finally, it is argued that the phrase “sin was dead” means that during this early time period, the individual has no corruption of sin in nature, and that therefore during this early time period, the individual is not spiritually dead “in trespasses and sins.” ------------------------------------------------------- Yet I would contend that the foundational viewpoint that Romans 7:8-9 reveals a two-fold sequence of spiritual conditions is incorrect. Rather, I would contend, not that the passage reveals a two-fold sequences of spiritual conditions, but that it reveals THREE-fold sequence of spiritual conditions. Indeed, I would contend that the “two-fold sequence” viewpoint misses a precise characteristic of the grammar in the closing portion of Romans 7:9. In the closing portion of Romans 7:9, the apostle did NOT testify simply that “when the commandment” of God’s law “came,” sin came alive, and that then he “died” spiritually. Rather, in the closing portion of Romans 7:9, the apostle testified precisely that “when the commandment” of God’s law “came” “sin REVIVED,” and that then he “died” spiritually. Now, herein the word “revived” precisely means “to come unto life AGAIN.” As such, the word “revived” precisely indicates that whatever was “revived” (in this case, “sin”) had proceeded through a THREE-fold process. First, it had been alive at least once BEFORE. Second, it had entered a condition of deadness. Third, it had been REvived, so as to be alive AGAIN. Even so, since God the Holy Spirit very specifically inspired the usage of the word “revived” in the closing portion of Romans 7:9, we should understand that there is a THREE-fold sequence of spiritual conditions, as follow: 1. First, a time period of life wherein sin IS ALIVE in an individual’s life. (As per the precise meaning of the Holy Spirit inspired word “revive.”) 2. Then, a time period of life “without the law,” when sin is “dead” in an individual’s life, and when the individual is spiritually “alive.” (As per the teaching of Romans 7:8b-9a.) 2. Afterward, a time period of life “when the commandment” of the law comes, such that sin revives in and individual’s life, and such that the individual spiritually dies. (As per the teaching of Romans 7:9b.) Furthermore, since Romans 7:8-9 reveals that sin’s condition of spiritual life or death in an individual’s life is directly connected to the force of the law in that individual’s life, we might also understand the following THREE-fold sequence concerning the law: 1. First, a time period of life wherein the individual is under the law. 2. Then, a time period of life wherein the individual is “without the law.” 3. Afterward, a time period of life “when the commandment” of the law comes again into the individual’s life. Now, this “three-fold sequence” viewpoint relieves any contradiction with other Biblical teaching that the “two-fold sequence” viewpoint seems to create. It relieves the contradiction that the “two-fold sequence” viewpoint creates with 2 Corinthians 5:14, which teaches that ALL were spiritually dead, and which teaches that Christ died for ALL because of this very fact. It relieves the contradiction that the “two-fold sequence” viewpoint creates with Psalm 51:5, which seems to teach that babies are conceived and “shapen” in a spiritual condition of sin and iniquity. It relieves the contradiction that the “two-fold sequence” viewpoint creates with Isaiah 53:6, Romans 3:12, Romans 3:23; and Romans 5:12, which teach that we ALL have gone astray from God, and have gone our own selfish way, and have gone out of the way of righteousness, and have sinned against God, and have come short of God’s glorious standard of holiness. It relieves the contradiction that the “two-fold sequence” viewpoint creates with Psalm 58:3, which teaches that babies go spiritually astray from God “as soon as they be born, speaking lies.” It relieves the contradiction that the “two-fold sequence” viewpoint creates with Romans 3:9 and Galatians 3:22, which teach that we ALL were bound under sin’s mastery. It relieves the contradiction that the “two-fold sequence” viewpoint creates with Romans 3:19, which teaches that we ALL were spiritually guilty before God. It relieves the contradiction that the “two-fold sequence” viewpoint creates with Ephesians 2:3, which teaches that we ALL were “by nature the children of wrath,” having God’s wrath already abiding upon us. It relieves the contradiction that the “two-fold sequence” viewpoint creates with Romans 5:18, which teaches that we ALL were under God’s judgment unto condemnation. Yet this “three-fold sequence” viewpoint does raise a question. In the “two-fold sequence” viewpoint, it is concluded that the time period “without the law” is the time period of babyhood and early childhood, because in that viewpoint it is the first time period and because in that viewpoint it appears to be the only logical possibility. However, if we consider the “three-fold sequence” viewpoint, we might ask – When then is the time period wherein an individual is “without the law”? I would contend that it is best to answer this question directly through the immediate context of Romans 7. So then, is there any other portion of Romans 7 that speaks about a time wherein an individual is “without” (or, apart from) God’s law? Indeed, Romans 7:4-6 states the following, “Wherefore, my brethren, ye also are become dead to the law by the body of Christ; that ye should be married to another, even to him who is raised from the dead, that we should bring forth fruit unto God. For when we were in the flesh, the motions of sins, which were by the law, did work in our members to bring forth fruit unto death. But now we are delivered from the law, that being dead wherein we were held; that we should serve in newness of spirit, and not in the oldness of the letter.” Herein verse 4 speaks about believers becoming “dead to the law by the body of Christ,” and verse 6 speaks about believers being “delivered from the law.” So then, in accord with the immediate context of Romans 7 itself, I would contend that the time period wherein an individual is “without the law” is that time wherein an individual is “become dead to the law” and is thereby “delivered from the law” through faith in Christ for eternal salvation. Yet this raises another question – What then did the apostle mean when he testified concerning himself as a believer in the closing portion of Romans 7:9 that “when the commandment came, sin revived,” and he “died”? After an individual is eternally saved through faith in Christ, do any commandments of God have any place in that believer’s life? Is a believer responsible to obey any of the commandments of God’s law? Can a believer experience the reviving of sin in his or her life? Can a believer experience spiritual deadness in his or her life? Can a believer ever return unto the spiritual condition of being completely dead unto God “in trespasses and sins”? The answer to these questions is revealed through the teaching of Romans 7:10 – 8:39.
  14. Indeed. 2 Corinthians 5:14 teaches us that Christ died for ALL specifically because ALL were spiritually dead. From this teaching we may conclude the following: 1. Christ only died for those who were spiritually dead. 2. If some (that is -- babies) were not spiritually dead, then Christ did not die for them. (Note: For those who hold that babies are not yet spiritually dead, consistency of doctrine would compel them to hold unto a form of "limited atonement" - although NOT for the same reasons as the Calvinists.) Furthermore, Galatians 3:22 teaches us that Scripture has concluded ALL to be "under sin" specifically so that the promise of eternal salvation through faith in Christ might be given "to them that believe." However, if some (that is -- babies) are not actually "under sin," then God's entire plan of eternal salvation through faith in Christ is "askew." Finally, if some (that is -- babies) are not spiritually dead in sins, and do not commit sin, or are not accountable for sin, and are not guilty of condemnation, then they would have NO NEED for the redemption of Christ's sacrifice, the cleansing of Christ's blood, the forgiveness of God's grace, the imputation of Christ's righteousness, the regeneration of the Holy Spirit, the propitiation of God's wrath, or the justification of God's just judgment. Indeed, then they would have no sin from which to be saved, and would have access unto the glory of heaven through their own merit of "innocence" or "righteousness."
  15. Weekly Sermon Introduction: A. Departing from the Father 1. To pursue the way of self Luke 15:11-12 – “And he said, A certain man had two sons: And the younger of them said to his father, Father, give me the portion of goods that falleth to me. And he divided unto them his living.” 2. To pursue the way of the world Luke 15:13 – “And not many days after the younger son gathered all together, and took his journey into a far country, and there wasted his substance with riotous living.” 3. To pursue the way of sin Luke 15:13 – “And not many days after the younger son gathered all together, and took his journey into a far country, and there wasted his substance with riotous living.” B. Reaping What Is Sown Hebrews 11:25 – “Choosing rather to suffer affliction with the people of God, than to enjoy the pleasures of sin for a season.” Galatians 6:7-8 – “Be not deceived; God is not mocked: for whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap. For he that soweth to his flesh shall of the flesh reap corruption; but he that soweth to the Spirit shall of the Spirit reap life everlasting.” James 1:15 – “Then when lust hath conceived, it bringeth forth sin: and sin, when it is finished, bringeth forth death.” 1. No pleasure Luke 15:14 – “And when he had spent all, there arose a mighty famine in that land; and he began to be in want.” 2. No provision Luke 15:15-16 – “And he went and joined himself to a citizen of that country; and he sent him into his fields to feed swine. And he would fain have filled his belly with the husks that the swine did eat: and no man gave unto him.” 3. No help Luke 15:15-16 – “And he went and joined himself to a citizen of that country; and he sent him into his fields to feed swine. And he would fain have filled his belly with the husks that the swine did eat: and no man gave unto him.” I. He Came to Himself – Realizing that it was better to be WITH the father. Luke 15:17 – “And when he came to himself, he said, How many hired servants of my father’s have bread enough and to spare, and I perish with hunger!” II. He Recognized His Sin. A. I have sinned. Luke 15:18 – “I will arise and go to my father, and will say unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and before thee.” B. I am not worthy. Luke 15:19 – “And am no more worthy to be called thy son: make me as one of thy hired servants.” C. I will serve. Luke 15:19 – “And am no more worthy to be called thy son: make me as one of thy hired servants.” III. He Returned to the Father. – Draw night to God with a broken heart, and He will draw night to you. Luke 15;20 – “And he arose, and came to his father. But when he was yet a great way off, his father saw him, and had compassion, and ran, and fell on his neck, and kissed him.” James 4:8-9 – “Draw nigh to God, and he will draw nigh to you. Cleanse your hands, ye sinners; and purify your hearts, ye double minded. Be afflicted, and mourn, and weep: let your laughter be turned to mourning, and your joy to heaviness.” IV. He Confessed His Sin. A. No excusing himself Luke 15:21 – “And the son said unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and in thy sight, and am no more worthy to be called thy son.” B. No trivializing his sin Luke 15:21 – “And the son said unto him, Father, I have sinned against heaven, and in thy sight, and am no more worthy to be called thy son.” C. No shifting of blame ​V. He Was Restored by the Father. A. Restored to peace Luke 15:22 – “But the father said to his servants, Bring forth the best robe, and put it on him; and put a ring on his hand, and shoes on his feet.” B. Restored to blessing Luke 15:23 – “And bring hither the fatted calf, and kill it; and let us eat, and be merry.” C. Restored to fellowship Luke 15:24 – “For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found. And they began to be merry.” ​Posted in Weekly Sermon, Luke, Repentance of Sin, Forgiveness of Sin, Spiritual Revival Please share this post with others: View the full article