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#1 JerryNumbers

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 12:29 PM

I feel sure most of you have heard people say, that's a funeral song, the only place you will hear it is at a funeral. One person made such a statement to me not long back, I replied, "If you would attend church with me for a few Sundays, you would hear these songs, for these songs you call funeral songs are regularly sang in our church."

To me when anyone makes such a statement, I instantly know they do not attend church, at least not in a church that plays godly hymns.

#2 holster

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 12:55 PM

I feel sure most of you have heard people say, that's a funeral song, the only place you will hear it is at a funeral. One person made such a statement to me not long back, I replied, "If you would attend church with me for a few Sundays, you would hear these songs, for these songs you call funeral songs are regularly sang in our church."

To me when anyone makes such a statement, I instantly know they do not attend church, at least not in a church that plays godly hymns.


I agree but also disagree somewhat.... I think sometimes good church going people also refer to "funeral music" in a church but not in the way you mention. I've heard many church services where the old time hymns were being sung but they were not being sung "in truth." They were beings sung with a "dead spirit." I like good spirited hymn singing and sadly, many times the song service is "dead." So in that respect, traditional hymns can sound like a "funeral service."

But funny, at the request of the families, most funerals I have a part in are purposely "upbeat" and "joyous" because it is a celebration of a loved one going to heaven. So the "funeral music" allusion isn't even always accurate!

But Jerry8.... I know what you are saying and I too will stick with the old hymns!

#3 amblivion

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 01:51 PM

Holster I am going to agree with you. At one church I was a member of, they did sing as if someone had just died. There was no enthusiasm or emotion in their voices. They just sang the words without comprehension.

As for people saying this song is a funeral song, I think that argument gets old real fast. I guess people are okay with the shallowness of many of the newer songs. I love hymns because they are rich in doctrine, and they actually mention the name of Jesus instead of saying you all the time. They use you so much for Christ that you could be a euphemism for His name.

#4 Invicta

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 06:03 PM

I think that "The Lord's my shepherd" is one of the most used hymns at funerals here.

One old lady we knew at a previous church always gave a new pastor her funeral hymn, "Sweeping through the gates of the new Jerusalem." (I think it starts "Who who are these..") My wife said she could just imagine her sweeping through the gates of the new Jerusalem.

I told a pastor I wanted "Oh how the grace of God amazes me." He said it was too long.

#5 JerryNumbers

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Posted 19 February 2010 - 10:20 PM

What do you call dead. people who don't dance around in church, don't wiggle their bodies, don't jump up and down, can't stand still while singing, don't wave their arms in the air, don't tap their foot, and ect, when they're singing and or songs are being sung?

If it is, them you would think our music is dead and I would probably feel completely at ease in the church that did such things. I remember a few years back and elderly lady called me to ask my opinion. She had recently attended the ending of the local Southern Baptist Churches Vacation Bible School program. She told me that the age group of 6 to 10 year old lined up in front singing a very spirited song. The girls dressed in everything from dresses to shorts, the boys in everything from dress pants to shorts. As they sing their song they dances around moving their bodies, swaying their hips back and forth, said they even turned their backs to the congregations while doing this. She wanted to know what I thought about it. My reply, they are not teaching those children to be godly, but worldly. Later that week I was able to watch this as they broadcasted it on our little local TV station. I must say, it was even worse than she described it. For even older boys and girls, 11 to 16 I suppose, did the same thing dressed in the same type of clothes. After the program the pastor made some comments, of how proud all of them could be for teaching these young children in their church to be godly. It would not be a big step for these children to step into a strip joint, they already had been taught the moves in Vacation Bible school.

I recall several years back our pastor had a nephew from out of town visiting. That Sunday morning he sang a special. I suppose he thought our church was dead in spirit. For he kept trying to get us to clap our hands and stomp our feet while he was singing. Oh, he sang the song right good, and he got several hearty amen's when he finished. After church I found out he attended one of those churches that dances around, claps their hands, waves this hands in the air, anytime music was being played or sung, and there he was trying to get us to go that route too.

Several years back I was at a coffee shop with a few people. I don't remember just what problem it was but a lady needed help starting her car at home. Another fellow and I when to her house to help here in my old truck for I had jumper cables as well as most any tool we might need. Just so happen I had a tape in my tape player that had church hymns playing. He made the comment, "Boy I really like those songs, you never hear good songs like that no more, do you?"

I replied, "Oh, I hear them quite often, generally every Sunday morning, Sunday evening, and Wednesday nights at church services. If you would attend church I promise you, you could hear them too." He quickly changed the subject.

Actually what I was referring to is people who never go to church, so the only time they hear any hymns at all is at a funeral service, songs such as Farther Along, Precious Memories, as well as other such song commonly used at funeral services.

#6 holster

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 09:31 AM

What do you call dead. people who don't dance around in church, don't wiggle their bodies, don't jump up and down, can't stand still while singing, don't wave their arms in the air, don't tap their foot, and ect, when they're singing and or songs are being sung?

No No No! Dead is when people sing with no meaning. Going thru the motions. Singing just because it's singing time. Lively singing has nothing to do with body. It has to do with one's spirit and WHY they are singing. The best singing I've ever heard has come from congregations that are not "moving" but standing and singing out loud for their Lord.


Actually what I was referring to is people who never go to church, so the only time they hear any hymns at all is at a funeral service, songs such as Farther Along, Precious Memories, as well as other such song commonly used at funeral services.


Farther Along and Precious Memories are great songs. I just don't equate this to "funeral music." In my mind, when someone says "This is funeral music." they are referring to (probably) a poor organ player who is doing their best but playing SO SLOW you can't sing to it. (As a song leader as well as preacher... I've been there. I've had some very nice, Godly people who just can't play... they go so slow and have such poor timing you literally can't sing with them.) I don't condemn them.. bless their hearts, they are doing their best for God. But the resulting song service is more like "funeral music" than happy singing for the Lord.

"Funeral Music" to me alludes to the slow "sad" organ music often played at non-church funerals (usually pre-lude and post-lude).

#7 Invicta

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 05:13 PM

Neither would I consider the one I mentioned earlier:

Who, who are these beside the chilly wave,
Just on the borders of the silent grave,
Shouting Jesu’s power to save,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb”?

Refrain

“Sweeping through the gates” of the new Jerusalem,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb,”
“Sweeping through the gates” of the new Jerusalem,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

These, these are they who, in their youthful days,
Found Jesus early, and in wisdom’s ways
Proved the fullness of His grace,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

These, these are they who, in affliction’s woes,
Ever have found in Jesus calm repose,
Such as from a pure heart flows,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

These, these are they who, in the conflict dire,
Boldly have stood amid the hottest fire;
Jesus now says, “come up higher,”
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

Safe, safe upon the ever shining shore,
Sin, pain, and death, and sorrow are all o’er;
Happy now and evermore,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

http://www.cyberhymn.../t/witbotla.htm

#8 JerryNumbers

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Posted 20 February 2010 - 08:25 PM

I understand what you saying.

The only thing that really bothers me is to try and preach after a song has been sung off key in a church where I've never preached before. But them I think, well, it may not have sounded off key to them! :coolsmiley:

#9 Invicta

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Posted 21 February 2010 - 04:55 PM

Someone said "God made the crow as well as the nightingale, and he likes to hear both of them.":icon_smile:

#10 amblivion

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 04:02 PM

What do you call dead. people who don't dance around in church, don't wiggle their bodies, don't jump up and down, can't stand still while singing, don't wave their arms in the air, don't tap their foot, and ect, when they're singing and or songs are being sung?

If it is, them you would think our music is dead and I would probably feel completely at ease in the church that did such things. I remember a few years back and elderly lady called me to ask my opinion. She had recently attended the ending of the local Southern Baptist Churches Vacation Bible School program. She told me that the age group of 6 to 10 year old lined up in front singing a very spirited song. The girls dressed in everything from dresses to shorts, the boys in everything from dress pants to shorts. As they sing their song they dances around moving their bodies, swaying their hips back and forth, said they even turned their backs to the congregations while doing this. She wanted to know what I thought about it. My reply, they are not teaching those children to be godly, but worldly. Later that week I was able to watch this as they broadcasted it on our little local TV station. I must say, it was even worse than she described it. For even older boys and girls, 11 to 16 I suppose, did the same thing dressed in the same type of clothes. After the program the pastor made some comments, of how proud all of them could be for teaching these young children in their church to be godly. It would not be a big step for these children to step into a strip joint, they already had been taught the moves in Vacation Bible school.

I recall several years back our pastor had a nephew from out of town visiting. That Sunday morning he sang a special. I suppose he thought our church was dead in spirit. For he kept trying to get us to clap our hands and stomp our feet while he was singing. Oh, he sang the song right good, and he got several hearty amen's when he finished. After church I found out he attended one of those churches that dances around, claps their hands, waves this hands in the air, anytime music was being played or sung, and there he was trying to get us to go that route too.

Several years back I was at a coffee shop with a few people. I don't remember just what problem it was but a lady needed help starting her car at home. Another fellow and I when to her house to help here in my old truck for I had jumper cables as well as most any tool we might need. Just so happen I had a tape in my tape player that had church hymns playing. He made the comment, "Boy I really like those songs, you never hear good songs like that no more, do you?"

I replied, "Oh, I hear them quite often, generally every Sunday morning, Sunday evening, and Wednesday nights at church services. If you would attend church I promise you, you could hear them too." He quickly changed the subject.

Actually what I was referring to is people who never go to church, so the only time they hear any hymns at all is at a funeral service, songs such as Farther Along, Precious Memories, as well as other such song commonly used at funeral services.


I am not trying to stir up trouble or anything, but I have a question for you Jerry#s. Do you believe it is wrong to raise your hands during praise to your King? Also, do you believe it is wrong to clap your hands to the music during a service? Don't get me wrong; there is not a problem if your church doesn't do these things. I am just wondering if you believe them to be wrong.

#11 HappyChristian

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 05:12 PM

Neither would I consider the one I mentioned earlier:

Who, who are these beside the chilly wave,
Just on the borders of the silent grave,
Shouting Jesu’s power to save,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb”?

Refrain

“Sweeping through the gates” of the new Jerusalem,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb,”
“Sweeping through the gates” of the new Jerusalem,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

These, these are they who, in their youthful days,
Found Jesus early, and in wisdom’s ways
Proved the fullness of His grace,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

These, these are they who, in affliction’s woes,
Ever have found in Jesus calm repose,
Such as from a pure heart flows,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

These, these are they who, in the conflict dire,
Boldly have stood amid the hottest fire;
Jesus now says, “come up higher,”
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

Safe, safe upon the ever shining shore,
Sin, pain, and death, and sorrow are all o’er;
Happy now and evermore,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

http://www.cyberhymn.../t/witbotla.htm

Love this! I've never heard it before. Thanks for sharing!! That last verse is a :thblisshe5:

#12 JerryNumbers

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 06:24 PM

Hand Clapping in Worship Service

Hand Clapping in Worship Service

For what it may be worth, I’d like to set forth my objections to hand clapping in worship services. This practice is relatively new to our churches, but its spread is alarming to me. Perhaps televised religious services have had some influence on us in adopting this new form of expression.

We do not clap our hands in worship services where I pastor for the simple reason that I believe hand clapping is in praise of a performance and is intended to compliment and magnify the performer. We have no place in our worship services for this. Our design is not to magnify the instrumentalists, singers, or preachers. Those who are at the instruments, on the platform or in the pulpit should be joining with the congregation to magnify and worship the Lord. It seems to me that a worshipful, muffled "Thank the Lord," "Praise the Lord," or "Amen" would be a much more appropriate response to some part of a worship service such as a song or a testimony or a particularly striking statement in a sermon.

I believe there are severe dangers in this alien practice. Number one, where will it lead? Will we stand and clap, holler and clap, jump and clap, whistle, throw our hats, hymnals and books in the air while we clap? Similar things are done in stadiums!

Number two, what does clapping say to people with charismatic leanings? Do we not say to them, "This is your crowd?" If we do, we have cultivated some people whose bag of tricks will change the whole character of our services much to our sorrow.

Number three, the practice of hand clapping in worship services is offensive to some, and I happen to be among that group. It dampens the spirit of worship in my soul and I am convinced that it has the same effect on some others.

Obviously, my opinions are not shared by all. But, I do insist that my views be respected in my territory. I believe it is proper for a guest to sit with his hands in his lap and wait for the host to pick up a fork and start eating first. Then the guest may start. By the same token, it seems proper to respect the mode of worship where we are and let the home folks set the tone.

Why make all the "to-do" about hand clapping in church? A worship service is a high point in my spiritual life and I believe every moment of it needs to magnify our Lord before us that our hungry souls may be fed. If any part of the service fails to magnify the Lord, I feel that I’ve been given a meatless bone which can never strengthen my life. I hope we will leave it to others to "jump for Jesus" and make a "clap offering" to the Lord. Eloquent Habakkuk wrote, "The Lord is in his holy temple: let all the earth keep silence before him."

~ Richard L. Walters The Baptist Trumpet


And please, take special notice of the words I put in bold and underlined.

#13 Seth Doty

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 09:29 PM

Hand Clapping in Worship Service

Hand Clapping in Worship Service

For what it may be worth, I’d like to set forth my objections to hand clapping in worship services. This practice is relatively new to our churches, but its spread is alarming to me. Perhaps televised religious services have had some influence on us in adopting this new form of expression.

We do not clap our hands in worship services where I pastor for the simple reason that I believe hand clapping is in praise of a performance and is intended to compliment and magnify the performer. We have no place in our worship services for this. Our design is not to magnify the instrumentalists, singers, or preachers. Those who are at the instruments, on the platform or in the pulpit should be joining with the congregation to magnify and worship the Lord. It seems to me that a worshipful, muffled "Thank the Lord," "Praise the Lord," or "Amen" would be a much more appropriate response to some part of a worship service such as a song or a testimony or a particularly striking statement in a sermon.

I believe there are severe dangers in this alien practice. Number one, where will it lead? Will we stand and clap, holler and clap, jump and clap, whistle, throw our hats, hymnals and books in the air while we clap? Similar things are done in stadiums!

Number two, what does clapping say to people with charismatic leanings? Do we not say to them, "This is your crowd?" If we do, we have cultivated some people whose bag of tricks will change the whole character of our services much to our sorrow.

Number three, the practice of hand clapping in worship services is offensive to some, and I happen to be among that group. It dampens the spirit of worship in my soul and I am convinced that it has the same effect on some others.

Obviously, my opinions are not shared by all. But, I do insist that my views be respected in my territory. I believe it is proper for a guest to sit with his hands in his lap and wait for the host to pick up a fork and start eating first. Then the guest may start. By the same token, it seems proper to respect the mode of worship where we are and let the home folks set the tone.

Why make all the "to-do" about hand clapping in church? A worship service is a high point in my spiritual life and I believe every moment of it needs to magnify our Lord before us that our hungry souls may be fed. If any part of the service fails to magnify the Lord, I feel that I’ve been given a meatless bone which can never strengthen my life. I hope we will leave it to others to "jump for Jesus" and make a "clap offering" to the Lord. Eloquent Habakkuk wrote, "The Lord is in his holy temple: let all the earth keep silence before him."

~ Richard L. Walters The Baptist Trumpet


And please, take special notice of the words I put in bold and underlined.


Hand raising and hand clapping is biblical in worship(Psalm 47:1, Psalm 63:4, Psalm 134:2 , Psalm 141:2, etc.) but many IFB's are wary of it due to the abuse of the practice by those in the charismatic movement. Very often it is turned into an occasion for the flesh and therefore is not worship at all. Knowing this there is a tendency among IFB's not to encourage it in public lest our churches also become entangled in fleshly behavior during what is supposed to be a time to worship the Lord. I think this is sound reasoning. In our culture due to charismatic influences such things as this can become a stumbling block that can lead immature believers astray and into a fleshly "worship" that is more motion, music and man centered than God centered. That certainly doesn't mean clapping or raising your hands is wrong, as I said it is biblical, but it does mean we should be careful how and where we do it. I will say that some of the most godly and biblically sound men I have known would lift up their hands to the Lord in both prayer and in praise at times. There is no shame in it and I think it honors the Lord as long as it is not being abused and used as an occasion for the flesh, but it is one of those things that is probably better done in private worship "most" of the time. We don't want to cause others to stumble. Likewise what Jerry80871852 bolded about respecting the practice of the individual church is an important point.

If occasionally someone in the service is very blessed by a song and feels led to lift up their hands it doesn't bother me in the least. Likewise if every once in a while the song director wants the people to clap during a particular song that doesn't bother me either. It can be valid praise and I think it can sound nice too. However if I vist a church and every song 90% of the people are lifting their hands(probably swaying to the music as well) that tells me something is more than likely wrong. Of course in that situation there is normally lots of other indicators too. :wink

#14 JerryNumbers

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 10:22 PM

I've only been in one church service where a woman would raise her arms from time to time. It was a revival service that I attended to hear a friend preach. After the service I asked a friend who attended that church about her. He told me she had moved off for several years and recently moved back home. During the time she was away she attended one of those charismatic churches. Said she was slowly starting to leave off the ways that the charismatic church had taught her. But still once in a while she would raises her arms in the air. He also stated no one in their church had spoke to her about it. I think they handled it properly.

I might add, in recent years a few of the Baptist Churches in these parts have stopped giving the hearty Amen's, and started the clapping. I'm 100% for the hearty amens.

I might add, the hearty amen is very biblical.

Nu 5:22 And this water that causeth the curse shall go into thy bowels, to make thy belly to swell, and thy thigh to rot: And the woman shall say, Amen, amen.
De 27:15 Cursed be the man that maketh any graven or molten image, an abomination unto the LORD, the work of the hands of the craftsman, and putteth it in a secret place. And all the people shall answer and say, Amen.
De 27:16 Cursed be he that setteth light by his father or his mother. And all the people shall say, Amen.
De 27:17 Cursed be he that removeth his neighbour's landmark. And all the people shall say, Amen.
De 27:18 Cursed be he that maketh the blind to wander out of the way. And all the people shall say, Amen.
De 27:19 Cursed be he that perverteth the judgment of the stranger, fatherless, and widow. And all the people shall say, Amen.
De 27:20 Cursed be he that lieth with his father's wife; because he uncovereth his father's skirt. And all the people shall say, Amen.
De 27:21 Cursed be he that lieth with any manner of beast. And all the people shall say, Amen.
De 27:22 Cursed be he that lieth with his sister, the daughter of his father, or the daughter of his mother. And all the people shall say, Amen.
De 27:23 Cursed be he that lieth with his mother in law. And all the people shall say, Amen.
De 27:24 Cursed be he that smiteth his neighbour secretly. And all the people shall say, Amen.
De 27:25 Cursed be he that taketh reward to slay an innocent person. And all the people shall say, Amen.
De 27:26 Cursed be he that confirmeth not all the words of this law to do them. And all the people shall say, Amen.

#15 Psalms18_28

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 10:37 PM


Neither would I consider the one I mentioned earlier:

Who, who are these beside the chilly wave,
Just on the borders of the silent grave,
Shouting Jesu’s power to save,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb”?

Refrain

“Sweeping through the gates” of the new Jerusalem,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb,”
“Sweeping through the gates” of the new Jerusalem,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

These, these are they who, in their youthful days,
Found Jesus early, and in wisdom’s ways
Proved the fullness of His grace,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

These, these are they who, in affliction’s woes,
Ever have found in Jesus calm repose,
Such as from a pure heart flows,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

These, these are they who, in the conflict dire,
Boldly have stood amid the hottest fire;
Jesus now says, “come up higher,”
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

Safe, safe upon the ever shining shore,
Sin, pain, and death, and sorrow are all o’er;
Happy now and evermore,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

http://www.cyberhymn.../t/witbotla.htm

Love this! I've never heard it before. Thanks for sharing!! That last verse is a :thblisshe5:


wow, seriously? this is the most popular song, even country singers sing this all the time. And movies too. sometime it is sang fast (like bluegrass) and sometimes it sang slow (I believe Johnny Cash sang it slow back in the 60's or 70's)

#16 Psalms18_28

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 10:42 PM

Never mind I was thinking "Are you washed in the blood of the lamb" two different version

#17 Seth Doty

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 11:12 PM

I've only been in one church service where a woman would raise her arms from time to time. It was a revival service that I attended to hear a friend preach. After the service I asked a friend who attended that church about her. He told me she had moved off for several years and recently moved back home. During the time she was away she attended one of those charismatic churches. Said she was slowly starting to leave off the ways that the charismatic church had taught her. But still once in a while she would raises her arms in the air. He also stated no one in their church had spoke to her about it. I think they handled it properly.

I might add, in recent years a few of the Baptist Churches in these parts have stopped giving the hearty Amen's, and started the clapping. I'm 100% for the hearty amens.

I might add, the hearty amen is very biblical.



Here in texas it is not that uncommon in some IFB churches and has been not uncommon for at least 20 years which is about as far back as I can remember. :wink The degree varies from church to church and person to person of course though. It is interesting that you say in your area that some baptist churches stopped amening and started clapping. In this area it seems to be different. The churches that folks sometimes raise their hands in seem to amen quite a bit while the churches that don't hardly ever do. I don't know exactly why this is since I don't think anyone is against an "amen" per se, pastors usually try to encourage it, but perhaps it is due to a reluctance to draw attention to ones self as giving an "amen" can do.

FYI the church I have attended for the past several years hardly ever has anyone raise their hands or give an amen. I don't have a problem with that and I personally am not prone to do either in public, but it does not bother me if someone else does occasionally. In the past I have attended churches where both amening and hand raising was more common.

#18 JerryNumbers

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Posted 22 February 2010 - 11:59 PM



Neither would I consider the one I mentioned earlier:

Who, who are these beside the chilly wave,
Just on the borders of the silent grave,
Shouting Jesu’s power to save,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb”?

Refrain

“Sweeping through the gates” of the new Jerusalem,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb,”
“Sweeping through the gates” of the new Jerusalem,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

These, these are they who, in their youthful days,
Found Jesus early, and in wisdom’s ways
Proved the fullness of His grace,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

These, these are they who, in affliction’s woes,
Ever have found in Jesus calm repose,
Such as from a pure heart flows,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

These, these are they who, in the conflict dire,
Boldly have stood amid the hottest fire;
Jesus now says, “come up higher,”
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

Safe, safe upon the ever shining shore,
Sin, pain, and death, and sorrow are all o’er;
Happy now and evermore,
“Washed in the blood of the Lamb.”

Refrain

http://www.cyberhymn.../t/witbotla.htm

Love this! I've never heard it before. Thanks for sharing!! That last verse is a :thblisshe5:


wow, seriously? this is the most popular song, even country singers sing this all the time. And movies too. sometime it is sang fast (like bluegrass) and sometimes it sang slow (I believe Johnny Cash sang it slow back in the 60's or 70's)


I don't believe that I've ever heard this song in my 63 years of living.

#19 JerryNumbers

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 12:37 AM

It was about 25 years back when I saw the 1st person raise their arms in a Baptist Church. I might mentioned, the friend I went to hear preach at that revival died from a heart attack shortly after that. Boy, I was so glad I made the effort to drive way up in the country side that night. A few years later his younger brother who I had never know surrendered to preach and was my pastor for a few years.

During those days, prior to them, and up to perhaps 10 or so years back, most Baptist Churches had the hearty amen's in them throughout this area.

Now, this is just my opinion, I think its slacked off in Baptist Churches around here because of the behavior of those who attend the charismatic churches. I've never know but one Baptist pastor who did not like the amen's, I never did figure that man out, he will always be a puzzle to me.

As for me, during a preaching service I would amen quietly several times, them on what I deemed special points I would give a good hearty amen. As a pastor I love amen's. If I attend funeral services in a funeral home I will generally keep quite. If I attend a funeral service in a church that I'm not familiar with, I will not amen out loud unless I hear someone else do so. I recall 2 different funerals I've attended in recent years where there was one person setting in the family section that gave several good hearty amen's.

One of the men in our church some time back thanked me for saying amen to certain points while he is leading a prayer, he told me that was a real encouragement for him. I just replied, encourage me once in a while, I just might preach myself to death so that y'all can get rid of me. At that moment it did not dawn on him was I had just said, but did so later on and mentioned it to me.

I think a person who is attending a church they have never been to before, it they are of the hand raising persuasion, if they don't see any hand raising that it would be best, plus show respect, if they would refrain from raising theirs. That is my humble opinion, and I try to live by it when I'm visiting a church.

There is a verse in the New Testament had pointed out to me years ago by a pastor on this subject, but I can't remember it right off.

#20 Psalms18_28

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Posted 23 February 2010 - 08:24 AM


I've only been in one church service where a woman would raise her arms from time to time. It was a revival service that I attended to hear a friend preach. After the service I asked a friend who attended that church about her. He told me she had moved off for several years and recently moved back home. During the time she was away she attended one of those charismatic churches. Said she was slowly starting to leave off the ways that the charismatic church had taught her. But still once in a while she would raises her arms in the air. He also stated no one in their church had spoke to her about it. I think they handled it properly.

I might add, in recent years a few of the Baptist Churches in these parts have stopped giving the hearty Amen's, and started the clapping. I'm 100% for the hearty amens.

I might add, the hearty amen is very biblical.



Here in texas it is not that uncommon in some IFB churches and has been not uncommon for at least 20 years which is about as far back as I can remember. :wink The degree varies from church to church and person to person of course though. It is interesting that you say in your area that some baptist churches stopped amening and started clapping. In this area it seems to be different. The churches that folks sometimes raise their hands in seem to amen quite a bit while the churches that don't hardly ever do. I don't know exactly why this is since I don't think anyone is against an "amen" per se, pastors usually try to encourage it, but perhaps it is due to a reluctance to draw attention to ones self as giving an "amen" can do.

FYI the church I have attended for the past several years hardly ever has anyone raise their hands or give an amen. I don't have a problem with that and I personally am not prone to do either in public, but it does not bother me if someone else does occasionally. In the past I have attended churches where both amening and hand raising was more common.


I always hated drawing attention to myself. that's pretty much it.

I was raised not to be loud, rude, showoff, etc in churches, funeral homes, libraries, schools, etc.. It doesn't mean I don't have a spiritual problem because of it.




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