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Should children take communion?


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#61 Salyan

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 03:55 PM

Good points. It still seems a bit muddled though - I like knowing who the authorities are.

#62 John81

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 07:23 PM

It has nothing to do with independent baptist churches (and I've mentioned before that you need to stop saying that: it sounds very much like you are disparaging IB's and IFB's....we accept, believe and practice the Bible. Period. It is appearing in far too many or your posts of late). It has to do with the Bible. And I never mentioned delinquent youth. As to unbaptized - the Bible doesn't say one has to be baptized to partake. It's wise not to until that step has been taken, but don't try to put restrictions where the Bible doesn't.

I think it should be obvious to anyone who's read my posts about this that I am speaking of parents who know what the Lord's Supper is all about - and, if they are in a biblical church, and they know their Bible, they will know. If they don't know their Bible, instruction from the pulpit will teach them about it. And, indeed, if that known, delinquent, baptized youth wants to get right with God, and takes the opportunity of the Lord's Supper to do so - that is exactly one of the reasons for communion. Examining ourselves, taking care not to observe unworthily.

Another excellent post. Sadly, there is one here who appears to simply want to argue and debate, not learn and apply the Word.

#63 Annie

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 09:52 PM

Sadly, there is one here who appears to simply want to argue and debate, not learn and apply the Word.

I'm not sure about that...and I think there's room for healthy debate about topics like this one. Clearly, different churches have different traditions when it comes to the Lord's Supper, and I'm not sure there's "just one way" to think about it. On the whole, I agree with those who have said that pastoral leadership, combined with parental discretion, should provide the guidance needed when it comes to this issue.

#64 John81

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 07:15 AM


Sadly, there is one here who appears to simply want to argue and debate, not learn and apply the Word.

I'm not sure about that...and I think there's room for healthy debate about topics like this one. Clearly, different churches have different traditions when it comes to the Lord's Supper, and I'm not sure there's "just one way" to think about it. On the whole, I agree with those who have said that pastoral leadership, combined with parental discretion, should provide the guidance needed when it comes to this issue.

Actually Scripture is clear on such matters and LuAnne has done a good job in showing this. Church tradition doesn't (or shouldn't) trump Scripture. Scripture itself warns of the traditions of men.

#65 Invicta

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 02:48 PM


There is no instance in Scripture of someone who has not been saved taking the Lord's Supper except Judas, who is a horrible example of how we should be raising our children.

Children should fully understand what the Lord's Supper is and be able to "examine themselves" while taking it. If they are too young to be saved, they are too young to "examine themselves". A child needs to understand sin and the sacrifice on the cross before they can understand communion, which means they are going to be about the time of the age of accountability and can choose Christ by the time they are old enough to understand communion.

I know it sounds very spiritual and godly to let a three year old child partake, but practically speaking, that three year old only knows they are eating a snack at church. Which is not the way communion is to be viewed. Whenever my kids were younger, I either put them in the nursery during communion, OR I just explained that its for people who have Jesus in their Heart. They usually accepted that. Once they were old enough to say "I want Jesus in my Heart, too" and could understand sin, and the sacrifice Christ made, AND get saved and baptized, then they were old enough to understand that communion is more than just a snack, but a time to think about the sacrifice Christ made, and be sure our hearts are right with Him....which has been, so far, generally around the age of five.


Actually, Judas didn't. He left before the Lord broke the bread.


I apologize, you are quite correct.

#66 dantheman2

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 03:47 PM



There is no instance in Scripture of someone who has not been saved taking the Lord's Supper except Judas, who is a horrible example of how we should be raising our children.

Children should fully understand what the Lord's Supper is and be able to "examine themselves" while taking it. If they are too young to be saved, they are too young to "examine themselves". A child needs to understand sin and the sacrifice on the cross before they can understand communion, which means they are going to be about the time of the age of accountability and can choose Christ by the time they are old enough to understand communion.

I know it sounds very spiritual and godly to let a three year old child partake, but practically speaking, that three year old only knows they are eating a snack at church. Which is not the way communion is to be viewed. Whenever my kids were younger, I either put them in the nursery during communion, OR I just explained that its for people who have Jesus in their Heart. They usually accepted that. Once they were old enough to say "I want Jesus in my Heart, too" and could understand sin, and the sacrifice Christ made, AND get saved and baptized, then they were old enough to understand that communion is more than just a snack, but a time to think about the sacrifice Christ made, and be sure our hearts are right with Him....which has been, so far, generally around the age of five.


Actually, Judas didn't. He left before the Lord broke the bread.


I apologize, you are quite correct.


Judas had not left.

#67 rancher824

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Posted 31 July 2011 - 04:46 PM

It can't be a church matter AND a family matter, logically. Who trumps?


I will try to give my answer to your question. The short answer would be the one that says "no."

Now I will try the long answer. I will start by saying I believe in CLOSED communion. I believe communion is one of the two ordinances of the local new testament church. That it should be held with and by the membership of the local church. I also believe that if a church is not in proper fellowship it should not have the Lord's Supper until it repairs the fellowship. Now back to my answer. I personally believe that when a child is saved (whether at age 4 or 20 makes no difference) and baptized and becomes a member of the local church they should be allowed to partake in communion. But I know some feel their child needs more time to mature in the Lord first. If a parent feels their child is not ready, then they should say no. There should be no other questions from anyone. The parent has spoken. One no and one yes from the church equals a No. But if we look at a older child, say maybe 16. The parents feel since he has been saved and baptized when younger he should be allowed. But the church as a whole knows he is living in open fornication. They say NO. Again one no and one yes equals a NO. The no is the trump card. I will say though in the second example the no should be a general no, as in the church should not have communion until the matter is taken care of (see 1 cor 5). This is one reason I believe in closed communion. But for a third way of looking at it. A child is eight and a saved, baptized member. His parents feel he should partake, but the church says no to anyone under the age of 12. In this case the No may be the trump, but it is more than likely time for the family to move on to a church that does not try to take more authority than the Bible gives.

#68 Salyan

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Posted 02 August 2011 - 12:26 AM

Good answer! Thank you.

#69 godlovingmomma

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 08:19 PM

Dear Kindofblue 1977,

 

I have been struggling with this lately as well.  Our sermon was actually on this today.  I think the issue we are dealling with here is doctrine/tradition/religion vs. Jesus/scripture/faith.  It is a common practice to wait until one is "saved" and baptized until one partakes in communion. Is this a traditional/religious practice or a Godly/scriptural practice?I believe this practice is man-made so to speak. At the last supper, was EVERYONE baptized? Was everyone "saved"?  Only God knows truly, yet Jesus did not deny the bread and wine to ANYONE!  My children are young as well, they know God, they pray to him, they worship him, they ask him for guidance...Why should they be denied the most simple way to honor and remember our Lord and Savior? After all, Jesus teaches us that unless we become like them, we will never enter the gates of heaven.  "Let the little children come to me."  He says it all.  There are obviously many people who disagree with me, but I do not answer to them, I answer to the Lord!  And He has been screaming at me lately to allow my children to take the bread and wine...and we pray and I teach them, but they always teach me more!  It is exactly what God wants and it is wonderful! 



#70 Eric Stahl

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 04:33 AM

I have been talking about this extensively with a friend of mine. We both have daughters who are three years old. His daughter has not yet expressed an interest in taking communion. Mine has, and we have decided to allow her to participate.

My friend has a real hang up about this, believing that communion is solely for those who have already made a decision to trust in Christ. My view is that my wife and I have made that decision, and our household is part of the New Covenant under christ. We have committed to raising her in the faith and to direct her hopeful that she wll grow in faith and make her own decision to follow Christ. As my household is full participating members of our church, we decided to allow her to take communion with us when she expressed an interest. She did so about four weeks ago, and we talked about how it is to remind us that Jesus loves us and died for us. When the priest came by, she held out her hand and received a wafer, and he told her that it was a reminder that Jesus loves her and died for her. She dipped the wafer in the wine, and likewise, she was told that it was to reminder her that Jesus loves her and died for her.

The position of my church is that it is up to the parents (if the parents are baptized believers) as to when their children will participate.
I have studied the Scriptures carefully, and there seems to be nothing directly on point. We are to take the bread and wine to remember Jesus. Jesus did it with his disciples. The early believers took communion as a full meal (similar to the passover), and were admonished by Paul in one church that the rich were eating and the poor were going hungry. In the Passover meal, children were active participants. Jesus said "let the children come unto me." As I have thought about all of these things, I reached the conclusion that if I am right with God, and have committed to leading my familiy as followers of Christ, then she should participate. It is a great way to teach her about Christ and his love for us. As she grows in her capacity to understand, my hope is that she will make a decision to follow Christ.

My friend has a very different view. He believes that you must first have a full understanding of what Christ did for us.

As I have thought this through, I have wondered what message it will send if we tell her she cannot participate. Does that send a message to a child that God does not love her and that she is excluded somehow? Does that send a message that it is a special thing for adults to do once they are followers of Christ? How did the early chruch handle this and view this? How did children participate in the Passover meal, and should that participation be carried over into communion, which replaced the Passover meal in the New Covenant?

What is your belief on this topic? I'm just curious as I cannot seem to find specific instruction in Scripture either way, but can see how both views can be extrapolated from Scripture.

 

Kindofblue,

 

1 Corinthians 11:25-32

25 This cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me.

26For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.

27Wherefore whosoever shall eat this bread, and drink this cup of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord.

28But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup.

29 For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord's body.

30For this cause many are weak and sickly among you, and many sleep.

31For if we would judge ourselves, we should not be judged.

32But when we are judged, we are chastened of the Lord, that we should not be condemned with the world.

 

 

I didn't read all the post on this subject so someone else may have shown you this.  I wanted to warn you. Taking communion is dangerous for those that don't understand what they are doing.



#71 JerryNumbers

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 05:13 AM

The Lord's Supper is only for baptized believers that are members of that local church that partaking of the Lord's Supper, & at the Last Supper you refer to everyone present was baptize believers being a member of the church at Jerusalem, the 1st local church founded by our Lord Jesus.

 

Its up to each New Testament Church to guard the Lord's Table, & also guard the welfare of anyone in attendance when that local church partakes of the Lord's Supper. Eric pointed this out with the verses from 1 Corinthians 11:25-32. If a local New Testament Church fails to do this they have failed Jesus, & failed those who fail to examine their self properly according to Scriptures allowing people to partake that are not baptized members of that Local Church.

 

Children who are not saved, are not baptized believers, should never be invited to the Lord's Table. All of this can be learned by the saved member of each New Testament Church from the pages of the Holy Bible. That is if they will take the time necessary to take up this their KJB studying everything within its pages that deals with the partaking of the Lord's Supper by a local New Testament Church.

 

Before doing anything in the name of the Lord one needs to 1st be sure they're carrying it out properly as instructed in the pages of the Bible. For the Lords ways are not mans way.

 

I'm happy that some people have hangups about this subject, for only the truth will please our Lord.

 

 

Joh 3:21 But he that doeth truth cometh to the light, that his deeds may be made manifest, that they are wrought in God.
 
And so it is, he that doeth not the truth does not come to the light.
 
Joh 4:23 But the hour cometh, and now is, when the true worshippers shall worship the Father in spirit and in truth: for the Father seeketh such to worship him.
 
Joh 4:24 God is a Spirit: and they that worship him must worship him in spirit and in truth.


#72 ASongOfDegrees

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 08:59 AM

If a person can "discern" the body of Christ (i.e. understand what Christ's death meant for them) then he/she can partake in communion no matter what the age. If not, then they can't. It's that simple. 



#73 ASongOfDegrees

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 09:02 AM

The Lord's Supper is only for baptized believers that are members of that local church that partaking of the Lord's Supper, 

So if I'm away visiting a church I can't partake of communion because I'm not a member of that local church? Don't add things to the bible that aren't there.



#74 Fixation

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 09:40 AM

So if I'm away visiting a church I can't partake of communion because I'm not a member of that local church? Don't add things to the bible that aren't there.

 

It would really just depend on the church you are visiting. I believe the church has a little bit of liberty on this. There are 3 common methods of partaking in the Lord's Supper: 1. Closed Communion; 2. Close Communion; and 3. Open Communion.

 

1. Only members of that local church may participate in the Lord's Supper (i.e. baptized believers that are member's of that local church)

2. Any baptized believer from a church of like-faith may participate in the Lord's Supper.

3. Any person who desires to partake of the Lord's Supper may participate.

 

When I read the story of when Jesus instituted the Lord's Supper, it was with the disciples, and even then, only after Judas had left. It is my opinion that a Closed Communion resembles this the closest. But, since there is no specific reference as to HOW to administer communion, other than the fact that we are commanded to observe it, I would think this would fall under liberty. In the end, we are all accountable for our actions, and if we partake of the Lord's Supper in an inproper manner, we will answer for it.



#75 kindofblue1977

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 09:40 AM

Kindofblue,

 

1 Corinthians 11:25-32

25 This cup is the new testament in my blood: this do ye, as oft as ye drink it, in remembrance of me.

26For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord's death till he come.

27Wherefore whosoever shall eat this bread, and drink this cup of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord.

28But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup.

29 For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord's body.

30For this cause many are weak and sickly among you, and many sleep.

31For if we would judge ourselves, we should not be judged.

32But when we are judged, we are chastened of the Lord, that we should not be condemned with the world.

 

 

I didn't read all the post on this subject so someone else may have shown you this.  I wanted to warn you. Taking communion is dangerous for those that don't understand what they are doing.

 

You say taking communion is dangerous for those who do not understand.

 

Who is capable of understanding?  Who makes that determination?  Can a young adult with downs syndrome, who loves God partake?  After all, her ability to understand is no greater than that of a young child around the age of 5.  Can a child understand?  My 3 year old certainly understands that Jesus loves her and that she loves Jesus, and understands Communion is not a snack.  As we go forward to receive communion each week, she whispers in my ear, "Daddy, Jesus loves us."  What about a man who has brain damage from an auto accident, and has very low mental capabilities.  Can he understand?   Am I truly capable of understanding what God did for us?  Who is the judge of that?

 

Every man, woman and child has different levels of understanding.  My 3 year old's level of understanding is that Jesus loves us all.  My 5 year old understands that Jesus died for her and came back to life, and that the bread and cup reminds of us his flesh and blood.  

 

Each person has a different capability and different level of understanding.  We all come to the table, and to Christ as we are, like children.  Christ will not refuse us if we come willingly, so why should we refuse a child if they understand that Jesus loves them?  



#76 ASongOfDegrees

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 09:55 AM

When I read the story of when Jesus instituted the Lord's Supper, it was with the disciples, and even then, only after Judas had left. It is my opinion that a Closed Communion resembles this the closest. But, since there is no specific reference as to HOW to administer communion, other than the fact that we are commanded to observe it, I would think this would fall under liberty. In the end, we are all accountable for our actions, and if we partake of the Lord's Supper in an inproper manner, we will answer for it.

I wouldn't compare a saved man visiting another local church to Judas Iscariot in the Upper Room. Just my opinion. If we are part of the body of Christ ("the Lord's body" as Paul mentions in the passage) then you can take communion no matter what church we are in. The local church is not "the Lord's body". It a gathering of people who may be part of the body of Christ.



#77 Fixation

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 09:59 AM

I wouldn't compare a saved man visiting another local church to Judas Iscariot in the Upper Room. Just my opinion. If we are part of the body of Christ ("the Lord's body" as Paul mentions in the passage) then you can take communion no matter what church we are in. The local church is not "the Lord's body". It a gathering of people who may be part of the body of Christ.

 

It was not my intention to compare a saved man visiting another local church to Judas. I agree, in part, with the rest of your post. The Pastor of that local church is responsible for that particular "flock", and thus the responsibility falls on him ultimately if he allows un-vetted, and unsaved, individuals partake of communion. That is why I believe it is a liberty issue.



#78 Eric Stahl

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 02:29 PM

You say taking communion is dangerous for those who do not understand.

 

Who is capable of understanding?  Who makes that determination?  Can a young adult with downs syndrome, who loves God partake?  After all, her ability to understand is no greater than that of a young child around the age of 5.  Can a child understand?  My 3 year old certainly understands that Jesus loves her and that she loves Jesus, and understands Communion is not a snack.  As we go forward to receive communion each week, she whispers in my ear, "Daddy, Jesus loves us."  What about a man who has brain damage from an auto accident, and has very low mental capabilities.  Can he understand?   Am I truly capable of understanding what God did for us?  Who is the judge of that?

 

Every man, woman and child has different levels of understanding.  My 3 year old's level of understanding is that Jesus loves us all.  My 5 year old understands that Jesus died for her and came back to life, and that the bread and cup reminds of us his flesh and blood.  

 

Each person has a different capability and different level of understanding.  We all come to the table, and to Christ as we are, like children.  Christ will not refuse us if we come willingly, so why should we refuse a child if they understand that Jesus loves them?  

 

 

If your three year old can do the following he or she could take communion.

 

28But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup.

29 For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord's body.

30For this cause many are weak and sickly among you, and many sleep.

31For if we would judge ourselves, we should not be judged.


Edited by Eric Stahl, 18 March 2013 - 02:30 PM.


#79 kindofblue1977

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 02:33 PM

If your three year old can do the following he or she could take communion.

 

28But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup.

29 For he that eateth and drinketh unworthily, eateth and drinketh damnation to himself, not discerning the Lord's body.

30For this cause many are weak and sickly among you, and many sleep.

31For if we would judge ourselves, we should not be judged.

 

Would the same hold true for a person with Down's Syndrome?  A 30 year old with Down's, as a woman in my church, has the same mental capacity as a three year old.

 

We are to come to Jesus as children. Jesus welcomed children.  Under the Old Covenant, children partook of the feast of the Passover, which is what communion replaced under the New Covenant.

 

God does not accept people based upon their mental capacity.  God accepts people where they are at if they respond to him.  Children and mentally incompetent adults can do that.  



#80 Eric Stahl

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 02:56 PM

Would the same hold true for a person with Down's Syndrome?  A 30 year old with Down's, as a woman in my church, has the same mental capacity as a three year old.

 

We are to come to Jesus as children. Jesus welcomed children.  Under the Old Covenant, children partook of the feast of the Passover, which is what communion replaced under the New Covenant.

 

God does not accept people based upon their mental capacity.  God accepts people where they are at if they respond to him.  Children and mentally incompetent adults can do that.  

I agree.

There was a man in my church who was below normal mental ability but he loved Jesus. He would sit in the front pew and when we took up the offering he faithfully put in his little envelope. One day I said to him " Bobby when we get to heaven I want to vist you and see your mansion." I think many of the people in the church will be shocked at his rewards. God will judge us according to what we could have done as well as what we did. To whom much is given, much will be required of!






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