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Matthew 12:40

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The crucifixion took place on Wednesday at 9AM, but the next day was a Annual High Sabbath, so Jesus had to be removed from the cross and buried by sundown. The women had to wait until Friday to go shopping for the burial spices, and Saturday was a normal Sabbath.
Also, in Galilee, the Jews began the day at sunrise, but the Jews in Judea began the day at sunset (as per Genesis).
So, if you figure it all out in Jewish terms, everything "adds up".

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This just made me think more about that whole sun standing still bit. God not only would have had to hold the earth still in its rotation, but would have had to keep all the little systems that depend on the rotation of the earth still going too. Wow!! What an amazing God is our God!

 

Its amazing the powers that God does have & I believe some people tries to limit His powers.

 

Which make me think of something, >so I will start a new topic trying not to high-jack this one.

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Sorry OP, you still haven´t had your question answered. I would think that there probably is no literature available that would give you what you ask. All citations to the effect that a partial day is still as good as a whole day will come from the very sources that cite it as definitive. In other words, it´s a circle of citation. One writer states the claim as factual, and the next quotes the first author. There is no vetting. And then you have a construct of a fact based upon the writing of someone whose statement was never verified.

 

Try the Nexus Index.

 

God bless,

calvary

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Calvary,

 

re: "All citations to the effect that a partial day is still as good as a whole day will come from the very sources that cite it as definitive."

 

So it's a good thing that that is not what I'm looking for.

 

 

 

 

re: "Try the Nexus Index."

 

I'm not familiar with that.

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Calvary,

 

re: "All citations to the effect that a partial day is still as good as a whole day will come from the very sources that cite it as definitive."

 

So it's a good thing that that is not what I'm looking for.

 

 

 

 

re: "Try the Nexus Index."

 

I'm not familiar with that.

 

 

"Whenever the three days and three nights of Matthew 12:40 is brought up in a "discussion" with 6th day crucifixion folks, they frequently argue that it is a Jewish idiom for counting any part of a day as a whole day. I wonder if anyone has documentation that shows an example from the first century or before regarding a period of time that is said to consist of a specific number of days as well as a specific number of nights where the period of time absolutey doesn't/can't include at least a part of each one of the specific number of days and at least a part of each one of the specific number of nights?"

 

As I said, you will not find any citation from anywhere. You asked for documentation, I merely stated that it most likely does not exist, and if it does, it would be not be vetted.  Perhaps you´ve forgotten what you asked for. Seems to me you are in fact looking for outside sourcing to the effect of a statement supporting the 6th day Crucifixion folks. Again, it most likely does not exist.

 

Try Nexus Index. Or can you google? Not rocket science.

 

God bless,

calvary

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This is an email that I received that seems to have relevance to this topic.
 
Question: I understand that you believe that Jesus died on the cross on Thursday, not Good Friday. Why do you say that, and does it matter?
 
Response: Scripture reveals the answer. 
 

 

Scripture does reveal the answer and He tells us we can rightly divide the truth.

 

2 Timothy 2:15 Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth. 

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Jesus was crucified on the Jewish Day of Preparation, which is

Friday. He was resurrected on Sunday  morning. He could not have been in the grave three 24 hour days and nights.

 

Friday crucifixion does not allow for three days & three nights in the tomb, as Jonah typified. Whether they were full or partial days/nights, He would still have had to be crucified earlier. Also, there were extra holydays that week - it was not merely the Saturday Sabbath that the Jews were concerned about defiling. 

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There was an Annual High Sabbath on Thursday of that year.  He was buried before sundown on Wednesday, without ointments and spices.  Friday, the ladies went shopping for the spices for the body.  Saturday was a normal Sabbath.  Sunday at daybreak the tomb was opened.

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John the Baptist,

 

re: "He could not have been in the grave three 24 hour days and nights."

 

 

So it looks like you are implying that Matthew 12:40 is an idiom. To support that idea

do you know of any writing as requested in the OP?

 

BTW, John 19:14 says that it was the "Preparation Day of the Passover". It doesn't say that it was the preparation day for the weekly Sabbath.

 

 

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There was an Annual High Sabbath on Thursday of that year.  He was buried before sundown on Wednesday, without ointments and spices.  Friday, the ladies went shopping for the spices for the body.  Saturday was a normal Sabbath.  Sunday at daybreak the tomb was opened.Thw 

 

The women went to the tomb while it was yet dark, so must have been before daybreak.  Matt. 28:1. tells us it was towards the end of the Sabbath, i.e. Saturday evening at twilight.  Mt 28:1  In the end of the sabbath, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week, came Mary Magdalene and the other Mary to see the sepulchre. Exactly 72 hours after the body was put in the grave.  

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The women went to the tomb while it was yet dark, so must have been before daybreak.  Matt. 28:1. tells us it was towards the end of the Sabbath, i.e. Saturday evening at twilight.  Mt 28:1  In the end of the sabbath, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week, came Mary Magdalene and the other Mary to see the sepulchre. Exactly 72 hours after the body was put in the grave.  

The Saturday Sabbath ended at the crack of dawn.  It clearly states that they came as it began to dawn on Sunday (first day of the week). 

Galileans observed from dawn to dawn, while those in Judea observed from dusk to dusk (Genesis: "evening and morning" the first day).

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The Saturday Sabbath ended at the crack of dawn.  It clearly states that they came as it began to dawn on Sunday (first day of the week). 

Galileans observed from dawn to dawn, while those in Judea observed from dusk to dusk (Genesis: "evening and morning" the first day).

 

Dawn probably means to begin.  The sabbath ended on Saturday evening, no need to invent  a Galilean element.  Jesus was put in the tomb as the Sabbath began, so 3 days and three nights would end at the same time of day.  The three days and three nights  refer to the time that He was in the tomb.

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Since it's been awhile, someone new looking in (who thinks that the crucifixion took place on the 6th day of the week, and who tries to get around Matthew 12:40 by saying that it is using common Jewish idiomatic language where 3 nights actually means 2 nights) may know of some writing.

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Since it's been awhile, someone new looking in (who thinks that the crucifixion took place on the 6th day of the week, and who tries to get around Matthew 12:40 by saying that it is using common Jewish idiomatic language where 3 nights actually means 2 nights) may know of some writing.

 

In other words, :bump3:  :wink

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Perhaps a further rewording of the OP will make it a bit more clear: Whenever the three days and three nights of Matthew 12:40 is brought up in a "discussion" with 6th day of the week crucifixion folks, they frequently assert that it is using common Jewish idiomatic language. I wonder if anyone knows of any writing that shows an example from the first century or before regarding a period of time that is said to consist of a specific number of days and/or a specific number of nights where the period of time absolutely couldn't have included at least a part of each one of the specific number of days and at least a part of each one of the specific number of nights?

Again, the purpose of this topic is not to discuss how long the Messiah was in the heart of the earth. There are other topics that do that. However, as I said, there are those who say that Matthew 12:40 is using common Jewish idiomatic language such as the Messiah saying that He would be in the heart of the earth for 3 nights when He knew that it would only be for 2 nights. But in order to say that it was common, one would have to know of other instances where the same pattern was used. I am simply looking for some of those instances, scriptural or otherwise. So far no one has come forth with any.

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That I am aware of, there is nothing like that, that lays out such ideas on time. However, I do believe that God laid out pretty clearly what HE sees as a day, in the creation week. "The evening and the morning were the first day..." A day consists of an evening and a morning. Does it mean is must be a complete 72 hour period? Not necessarily, I suppose, but enough to make it reasonable. because of this, the local idiom doesn't matter-the word was written by God according to His knowledge of things, not man's local idioms and turns of phrase. If God said three days and three nights, that's what He meant. The idea was invented probably by the Catholics, along with the idiom explanation. They feel free to invent whatever they like and call it fact because the Pope, their voice of God on earth, has declared it, and as such, it is truth. They say.

 

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15 hours ago, Ukulelemike said:

That I am aware of, there is nothing like that, that lays out such ideas on time. However, I do believe that God laid out pretty clearly what HE sees as a day, in the creation week. "The evening and the morning were the first day..." A day consists of an evening and a morning. Does it mean is must be a complete 72 hour period? Not necessarily, I suppose, but enough to make it reasonable. because of this, the local idiom doesn't matter-the word was written by God according to His knowledge of things, not man's local idioms and turns of phrase. If God said three days and three nights, that's what He meant. The idea was invented probably by the Catholics, along with the idiom explanation. They feel free to invent whatever they like and call it fact because the Pope, their voice of God on earth, has declared it, and as such, it is truth. They say.

 

Some Christians get stuck right there at the very beginning of Scripture with the creation account and just what is meant by "day". We even have a couple in our church that can't come to accept that in creating time God created the literal 24 hour day and created the earth just as stated in Genesis, in 6 literal days.

Naturally, not accepting a creation day as a literal 24 hour day causes them many other problems, including aspects of young earth vs old earth, matters involving evolution, Noah's ark, dinosaurs, the wide variety within species, and the amount of time Jesus spent in the tomb (among other things).

It seems there is a growing issue among many Christians in this area with regards to matters of time. Depending upon the conclusion a person comes to on this can greatly impact how they view a wide variety of things in Scripture. Some views, if taken to their logical conclusion, would even place the Scripture itself in question.

As to the time Jesus spent in the tomb, I believe it was just as stated in Scripture and the plain, simple understanding is accurate.

If I recall correctly from readings years ago, it was the RCC which began the short, partial time in the tomb with their invention of "Good Friday". In that view Jesus was barely in the tomb before Friday ended but they still call that one day; then Jesus spent all of Saturday in the tomb but was only in the tomb for a brief portion of Sunday which they count as a day. That view doesn't match the literal meaning of what Scripture says.

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There are three different times given not two.

In three days

Three days and three nights

After three days.

They must all mean the same  and I believe that Three Days and Three Nights is the exact time.  God is a God of exactness.  Twilight on Wednesday till twilight on Saturday evening.  Mt 28:1  In the end of the sabbath, as it began to dawn toward the first day of the week, came Mary Magdalene and the other Mary to see the sepulchre.

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10 hours ago, John81 said:

Some Christians get stuck right there at the very beginning of Scripture with the creation account and just what is meant by "day". We even have a couple in our church that can't come to accept that in creating time God created the literal 24 hour day and created the earth just as stated in Genesis, in 6 literal days.

Naturally, not accepting a creation day as a literal 24 hour day causes them many other problems, including aspects of young earth vs old earth, matters involving evolution, Noah's ark, dinosaurs, the wide variety within species, and the amount of time Jesus spent in the tomb (among other things).

 "For the time will come when they will not endure sound doctrine; but after their own lusts shall they heap to themselves teachers, having itching ears; And they shall turn away [their] ears from the truth, and shall be turned unto fables." - 2 Timothy 4:3-4

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12 hours ago, John81 said:

Some Christians get stuck right there at the very beginning of Scripture with the creation account and just what is meant by "day". We even have a couple in our church that can't come to accept that in creating time God created the literal 24 hour day and created the earth just as stated in Genesis, in 6 literal days.

Naturally, not accepting a creation day as a literal 24 hour day causes them many other problems, including aspects of young earth vs old earth, matters involving evolution, Noah's ark, dinosaurs, the wide variety within species, and the amount of time Jesus spent in the tomb (among other things).

It seems there is a growing issue among many Christians in this area with regards to matters of time. Depending upon the conclusion a person comes to on this can greatly impact how they view a wide variety of things in Scripture. Some views, if taken to their logical conclusion, would even place the Scripture itself in question.

As to the time Jesus spent in the tomb, I believe it was just as stated in Scripture and the plain, simple understanding is accurate.

If I recall correctly from readings years ago, it was the RCC which began the short, partial time in the tomb with their invention of "Good Friday". In that view Jesus was barely in the tomb before Friday ended but they still call that one day; then Jesus spent all of Saturday in the tomb but was only in the tomb for a brief portion of Sunday which they count as a day. That view doesn't match the literal meaning of what Scripture says.

I read lots of post, but do not post.

I had to say Amen to your post John and to mark it liked by me, your 100% correct. Its amazing at the teaching that comes form people on this topic.

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