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#1 DaveW

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 09:52 PM

Rather than spread the other thread thin, I thought I would start another.

I have often wondered about the wisdom of the traditional Bible College.
Not about them going off the rails etc, but the actual concept itself.

Now I am not against Bible Colleges per se.

My wondering is with the idea that a young man gets saved in a good local church. He begins to grow in that good local church. He gets involved in the ministries of that good local church. He feels the calling of the Lord to deeper service in that good local church.
So the pastor and church send him across the country or even the world, to go to a Bible College many miles away from that good local church.

Now they may pick the best and greatest Bible College in all the world, but why does it make sense to send this man away from where the Lord is using him and growing him?

I understand that an individual Pastor (especially a tentmaker) may not be able to give him all the training he needs, and so he may need help from nearby pastors (solid men of course).
But he stay in the good local church, serving, learning, growing where the Lord has planted him.

Thoughts?

Edited by DaveW, 16 May 2013 - 09:55 PM.


#2 JerryNumbers

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 10:56 PM

Many do so because today many churches of any size adds to the qualifications given in the Bible that their pastor must be a Bible College graduated with a diploma.

 

I know one such church that did this, saying we will not have a pastor that is not a graduate. They called one, he said no. In the end they finally came up with a 70 year old pastors who had no Bible education, & they loved him!

 

Go figure!



#3 Salyan

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 11:11 PM

I concur. There are some types of training, or growth, that a college can be useful for, but by and large I think it's better to be trained in the local church. Especially since so often young people seem to go across the country to college and not return.

#4 Miss Daisy

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 11:11 PM

Also, true Bible preaching colleges credits are not transferrable to state colleges or any other colleges that accept federal money. True Bible colleges will not accept federal money, such as government backed student loans, because then they're under THEIR RULES.  Students can still get loans, just not government loans. And the college can truly teach the Bible. 

 

Going to Bible college makes future pastors or missionaries with some credentials and proof of learning. I know pastors are blessed by God also. But an 18 yr old kid needs more teaching and finding his niche in the ministry than any pastor probably wants to do. Time wise, patience wise, etc. And if the pastor isn't the best example that's who he's learning from. Most pastors out of Bible college seem to have to "do their time" as a youth pastor. Their closer in age and gives great teaching experience.



#5 Salyan

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 11:16 PM

There's another question... are young pastors/couples really the best youth leader? Sometimes I think having a mature couple that is experienced in raising their own youth would be better mentors for the youth than someone only a few years older. Sorry, off topic!

#6 brosmith

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 11:42 PM

In replying to this thread I am probably asking for stones to be thrown at me. Recently we visited Fairhaven Baptist College in Chesterton, Indiana during their preaching conference. The reason for our visit was because our oldest daughter was interested in attending and we thought we would check it out. For years we thought Fairhaven was the best choice. Now I am not so sure. To explain I will post the content of several emails that I sent them after we got home from our trip:

 

email #1

 

Hello,

 
     We were at the preaching conference this week and bought some books from the bookstore. One of the books is entitled "If I Perish" by Esther Ahn Kim. It is published by Moody Bible Institute and on the copyright page it states the following:
 
     "All scripture quotations, unless otherwise indicated, are taken from the American Standard Version of the Bible."
 
     "Scripture quotations marked NASB are taken from the New American Standard Bible copyright The Lockman Foundation 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977. Used by permission"
 
     My wife did not notice this before we bought the book, otherwise we would not have bought it. Was this book an oversight on your part or is it acceptable to you to sell books in your bookstore that quote from other Bibles?
 
Sincerely,
Bro Steve Smith

 

 

email #2
 

Hello again,

 
     We found one more book the uses a different Bible other than the King James. It is entitled "Dust of the Earth", a biographical fiction inspired by the life of J T Pace and written by Donna Lynn Hess. It is published by BJU Press. On the copyright page it states:
 
     "Scripture Quotations 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc." It does not state a particular Bible version but the verses are not from the King James Bible.
 
     Again, if we knew this ahead of time we would not have purchased the book. We are definitely interested in knowing your position on this.
 
Sincerely,
Bro Steve Smith

 

 
email #3
 

Hello,

 
     While we were there for the Preaching Conference I requested and received a list of approved music for dorm students. I have been going through the list and I find many troubling things. I am actually overwhelmed and grieved in my spirit. Here is a partial list of my concerns:
 
     Dino (All Creation Sings, Classical Peace) played for Kathryn Kuhlman. He is contemporary in music style and a charismatic.
 
     Burl Ives (30 Beloved Songs of Faith) was a 33 degree Mason.
 
 
 
     Eric Wyse (60 Songs of Devotion) is the Director of Music and Organist at St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church in Nashville, Tennessee. He writes contemporary Christian music.
 
 
     Hagood Hardy (Alone, Anne of Green Gables) played jazz and swing music.
 
 
     Play sample for track #6 of the Alone album to hear the swing and jazz sound.
 
     Patch the Pirate music is such an eclectic sound that some of it is revolting.
 
     http://www.majestytu...dika-fever.aspx (tracks 8 and 10 - as examples)
     http://www.majestytu...acka-woods.aspx (tracks 5 and 10 - as examples)
 
     In addition to these specific examples, I have many questions:
 
     Why would you allow students to listen to any music by the Mormon Tabernacle Choir?
 
     Why would you allow students to listen to any music sung or produced by non-Christians?
 
     Why would you allow students to listen to sound tracks from Broadway musicals such as Fiddler on the Roof?
 
     Why would you allow students to listen to sound tracks from Disney movies (such as Mary Poppins)?
 
     Why would you allow students to be influenced by adulterous romantic movies such as Gone With the Wind? (this I find perplexing and nauseating)
 
     Why would you allow students to listen to (or watch) any movie in the dormitory unless it was of a spiritual nature?
 
     Why would you allow students to listen to old time radio shows such as Escape? (I don't necessarily think it is wrong to listen to Old Time Radio - I just think that for the most part it is unwise and unprofitable)
 
     Why would you allow students to listen to music by Bing Crosby, Nat King Cole, Dean Martin, and Frank Sinatra who were all night club singers? (this I also find perplexing and nauseating)
 
     The reason why I am mentioning all of this is because I believe that young people who are preparing to serve the Lord in the ministry should focus upon spiritual things while in college. "25 Romantic Moods" to me is not the kind of thing that creates a spiritual atmosphere (as an example).
 
     In addition to these things, a couple of songs on your CDs that are sold in the bookstore were written by Oneness Pentecostals (Sheltered in the Arms of God by Dottie Rambo and Down From His Glory by William E. Booth-Clibborn). I also found a Bill Gaither song on one of your CDs (The King is Coming).
 
     I was also troubled by seeing a trap set (drum set) being used in the church.
 
     This is a short list of my concerns (there are many more). These things beg me to ask a question: What standards are used to determine what is acceptable and what is unacceptable when it comes to music?
 
     I am attaching to this email a book that I wrote entitled "The Day the Music Died" which gives my position on music.
 
Sincerely,
Bro Steve Smith

 

 
Fairhaven's reply to my 3 emails came in one email:
 

Hello Brother Smith,
 

 
I was glad that you and your family were able to come to the Preaching Conference last week.  I hope you enjoyed the meals, activities, preaching, and fellowship.
 
We have a sign on the shelf in our bookstore in the middle of our books that reads: 
 
Many of the great, old books have been changed by modern liberals.  They have changed the version of the Bible used by the authors and have written the forewords to the books.  We do not approve of these changes; however, we do not want to discard these good books and lose the benefits of these great authors.
 
With regard to our orchestra, it is inaccurate to refer to the church orchestra drums as a "trap set."  There is a big difference between a trap set and drums used in an orchestra. I'm sure you realized this as you heard our orchestra accompany the hymns and play the offertories.
 
Lastly, we realize that our list of approved music will never meet everyone's preference.  Ninety-nine percent of the criticism we get about our music standards is that they are too narrow.
 
Again, I am glad that you were able to get the time off to spend the week with us; we were glad to be able to provide the meals for your family.  I hope everyone was challenged as I was in my Christian walk.
 
 
Sincerely,
 
Dan Armacost

 

 

 


Edited by brosmith, 16 May 2013 - 11:51 PM.


#7 ASongOfDegrees

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 11:52 PM

I only know a few churches that hold theology and ministry classes. Most will send their young folks, or those called to the ministry in their church, away to some school. Many never return to the church. I'm not gonna say this is unscriptural but it sure isn't scriptural either IMO. For some reason pastors just don't teach theology and or train folks for the ministry anymore. Maybe because they are so beholden to their Alma mater or don't have the knowledge and confidence to teach. This seems to be a pattern set by the world.


Edited by ASongOfDegrees, 16 May 2013 - 11:53 PM.


#8 swathdiver

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 11:59 PM

Well Salyan, the reasoning behind that might be that the younger pastor is more effective because they're closer in age.  I think such a ministry needs both or at least the Pastor closely mentoring the Youth Pastor.

 

As for the OP, I think about that too.  The Lord used my pastor at an established church for a time and then called him back to his hometown to start one from scratch.  

 

Brother Smith, that's a shame.  Sure, the goats want the world's music, that's why they complain and these folks are giving it to them!  If the books were originally using KJV verses, then why not get hold of the old books and if possible reprint them?  

 

A little leaven has leavened the whole lump.   


Edited by swathdiver, 17 May 2013 - 12:03 AM.


#9 Ukulelemike

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 12:21 AM

WHile I have a master's in theology, this was gained after I became a pastor. All my training was essentially at the feet of my pastor(s), in local churches, in various positions, sunday school teacher to youth and adults, music director, and occasional preacher. Why would I need something "formal" when there is really nothing 'formal' about pastoring? And most things, like doing the business side, I either learned through practice, or by advice as needed. I have been 11 years in full-time ministry, this month, and am doing fine, though I admit to finding it hard at times to balance the church, a job and a farm.

 

By the way, I raise goats and they HATE worldly music!



#10 JerryNumbers

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 01:19 AM

I surrendered to preach in 1997, at the age of 51, my teachings wee from my local church, attending Bible study classes, & preaching services. Plus during that time I had one pastor that taught me outside of our church 1 night per week for two years. Why he did this I know not, but he offered to do so & I took him up on it. And of course my own personal Bible study at home.

 

And in 2001 I was called to pastor a church, I was 55. A young pastor at 55, yet I was not a novice as some are.



#11 JerryNumbers

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 01:34 AM

I wonder how many when in high school pick their vocation to become a pastor?



#12 swathdiver

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 03:25 AM

I think that mentor knew you'd be a preacher someday Jerry.  My Pastor surrendered to preach at 17.

 

My youngest has said she wants to be a missionary, or missionary's wife.  My eldest was quite interested in our visiting missionary from the Ivory Coast Wednesday night, Kristine McLaughlin.

 

http://www.bimi.org/...mclaughlinK.php



#13 Fixation

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 03:38 AM

I wonder how many when in high school pick their vocation to become a pastor?

 

I was adamantly opposed to ever being a pastor/preacher growing up, and even in my adult life. When I was preparing to transition out of the Navy, my wife jokingly said that I could become a pastor. My reply: "I do not EVER want to be a pastor!"

 

I had already made plans to move back to Texas, get my bachelors and masters in mechanical engineering, and pursue that as a career. We picked out a house, college, and even found a good church. Well, that was in October. In November, I attended a mens conference and it was there that God called me to preach. I'm not sure who was more surprised, me or my wife! Needless to say, we immediately scrapped our moving plans, and I started my training under my pastor. I currently serve as the Youth Director, and am still learning as much as I can.



#14 irishman

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 05:47 AM

My preacher and I visited Fairhaven years ago.  We had a young man that wanted to go there, so we "checked it out"  I was not too impressed.  They seemed "too good to be true."  It was like they were on their best, and only showed their best successes as if deliberately trying to impress us.  The president of the college at the time (Forgot the name, but I think it started with a "V", Volglen, or something like that.) was cordial enough but seemed to be hiding something.  The preacher and I both left with the same feeling, but the young man went there anyway.  How he fares now, I do not know, but his brother travels around singing Gospel sons, and thinks he's Elvis Presley, apparently.  He "swallows" the microphone, and moves a lot while singing, "stretching" notes that do not require it.  Anyway, since things usually go downhill over time, I imagine they are not much today, as ukelele Mike already stated.  We did not hear their music then though.



#15 Ukulelemike

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 07:04 AM

I was adamantly opposed to ever being a pastor/preacher growing up, and even in my adult life. When I was preparing to transition out of the Navy, my wife jokingly said that I could become a pastor. My reply: "I do not EVER want to be a pastor!"

 

I had already made plans to move back to Texas, get my bachelors and masters in mechanical engineering, and pursue that as a career. We picked out a house, college, and even found a good church. Well, that was in October. In November, I attended a mens conference and it was there that God called me to preach. I'm not sure who was more surprised, me or my wife! Needless to say, we immediately scrapped our moving plans, and I started my training under my pastor. I currently serve as the Youth Director, and am still learning as much as I can.

Wow-this parallels my own calling in a few ways-I was in my 9th year in the Navy, and while the thought of being a pasroe had passed through my mind, it was never serious; not that I didn't want to be, but I just never thought the Lord would find me usable. I went to a conference and I was called to preach there-I struggled with it the week I was there, and then the call was clear the last night, and I surrendered. Unfortunately, the parallel changes there, because my wife was, let's say, less than supportive. Anyways, within a year the Lord removed me from the Navy and set my path toward a long purging process of some things in my life,beginning in 1993, and I became a full-time minister in 2002, 9 years later.

 

Interestingly, I tried to fight the call for a while, but everywhere I ended up, I went to churches where the pastor just seemed to know and put me to work toward the goal. My last pastor, who graduated to glory about a year ago, reminded me constantly that, once called, and surrendered, there was no going back, and he kept me working.



#16 TheSword

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 08:06 AM

I'm a little late coming into this one, but here's my two-cents for what little it's worth:

 

I think both formal Bible college education and pastoral mentorship have their roles.  A pastor needs training in the Bible and how to rightly divide it (2 Tim 2:15).  A man who is 50 yrs old (as Jerry's example) has a great deal more life experience and, hopefully, Biblical knowledge than does an 18-year kid just out of high school.  They have a completely different set of things they need to learn and grow in to become an effective pastor.  I'm not saying the Bible college should be an absolute prerequisite for a pastoral position, but it serves a great purpose.  However, even a diploma and an alphabet of letters after a person's name cannot replace the mentorship and training by the local church/pastor. 

 

At my church we have an internship for people who feel called into the ministry but whose life situation preclude (or don't yet include) Bible college. It's a program in which the pastor asks for 5 years to give them guided learning, training, and spiritual growth to prep them for success in their ministry.  The pastor and I are also implementing a teaching ministry into this whereby we ask the person to get a minimal associate's degree to cover the basic life fundamentals, and then we teach courses on OT, NT, homilitics, hermenuetics, theology, etc.  The purpose isn't to award some accredited degree, just to ensure they have that foundational training.

 

Where I think many churches err in requiring an official degree for ministry is that they think it directly conveys some type of inherent qualification.  It may impart Biblical and theological knowledge, but that certainly does not equate to pastoral training.  I would surmise that most churches put this requirement in because they want some kind of assurance that their pastor knows what he is talking about, and they certainly deserve that assurance.  However, a B.S. in Religion, M.A.R., MDiv, ThM, or even PhD/ThD do not, themselves, make someone a capable pastor.  Only the Holy Spirit does that, and there should be a time of mentorship under someone spiritual gifted for that role to ensure that he has properly heard and understood his calling and that he has been spiritually gifted to do it.



#17 The Ohio Patriot

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 09:04 AM

I was adamantly opposed to ever being a pastor/preacher growing up, and even in my adult life. When I was preparing to transition out of the Navy, my wife jokingly said that I could become a pastor. My reply: "I do not EVER want to be a pastor!"

 

I had already made plans to move back to Texas, get my bachelors and masters in mechanical engineering, and pursue that as a career. We picked out a house, college, and even found a good church. Well, that was in October. In November, I attended a mens conference and it was there that God called me to preach. I'm not sure who was more surprised, me or my wife! Needless to say, we immediately scrapped our moving plans, and I started my training under my pastor. I currently serve as the Youth Director, and am still learning as much as I can.

 

It seems that we share the exact same thoughts in the past about becoming a Pastor. I believe God was calling me to the ministry when I was in high school, but I did not listen to that call and went about doing what I wanted to do.  I studied computer programming, networking, and voice services and developed a very successful,  (according to the world) career working for a major telecommunications manufacturer as an engineer working on VOIP and telecommunications switching equipment and troubleshooting.  I have traveled all over the country because of my job and missed out on what God had planned for me to do as a younger man.

 

My wife and I were married about 1 month out of high school, almost exactly 29 years ago.  We are involved with our local church, teaching Sunday School, volunteering around the world doing missions work, bible study, deacon, etc now.  When I still had that call that God wanted me to be involved in the Ministry our local Pastor, recommended signing up with Baptist College of America, which is a correspondence school, and all my service time has been done with our local church under the supervision of our Pastor.  When I enrolled in college I signed up for Biblical Studies because I believed that God would never want me to preach.  Long story short I realize now that going to college 29 years ago, and when I signed up with BCA, that I was the one telling God no, still after all these years, to be honest I am not sure what God has planned for me to do, it may be teaching in our local church, it may be preaching, I don't know but if I were to be called I am prepared to go, whenever and wherever   I changed my major from Biblical Studies to Church Ministries, knowing that it was me who was putting up a road block, and not God.  It has taken almost 30 years but I believe I am finally at the point where God can use me as He wishes and not as I was hoping.  

 

I know for many this comes earlier in life, for some of us who are hard headed, and lacking in faith it takes longer.  I know I have not wasted the last 30 years, I have been involved doing many things, visitation, soul winning, teaching, etc. but I still believe God has more for me to do now that I have fully surrendered to His service.



#18 BroMatt

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 10:25 AM

In replying to this thread I am probably asking for stones to be thrown at me. Recently we visited Fairhaven Baptist College in Chesterton, Indiana during their preaching conference. The reason for our visit was because our oldest daughter was interested in attending and we thought we would check it out. For years we thought Fairhaven was the best choice. Now I am not so sure. To explain I will post the content of several emails that I sent them after we got home from our trip:


My preacher and I visited Fairhaven years ago. We had a young man that wanted to go there, so we "checked it out" I was not too impressed. They seemed "too good to be true." It was like they were on their best, and only showed their best successes as if deliberately trying to impress us. The president of the college at the time (Forgot the name, but I think it started with a "V", Volglen, or something like that.) was cordial enough but seemed to be hiding something. The preacher and I both left with the same feeling, but the young man went there anyway. How he fares now, I do not know, but his brother travels around singing Gospel sons, and thinks he's Elvis Presley, apparently. He "swallows" the microphone, and moves a lot while singing, "stretching" notes that do not require it. Anyway, since things usually go downhill over time, I imagine they are not much today, as ukelele Mike already stated. We did not hear their music then though.


No stone being thrown here. There is a few of us Fairhaven folks on this board. One of our Mods currently goes to church there, they can tell you more about the current state of the church and college than me. I see Dan Armacost is still there, he was a student when I was there.
As far as I can tell they still are KJV only, I am surprised to see that they have non KJV material in their bookstore now.

As far as music goes, I remember while I was there around 18 years ago, that there was Patch tapes that we could not listen to nor would they sell in the book store because of music on the tapes.



#19 HappyChristian

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 11:18 AM



My preacher and I visited Fairhaven years ago.  We had a young man that wanted to go there, so we "checked it out"  I was not too impressed.  They seemed "too good to be true."  It was like they were on their best, and only showed their best successes as if deliberately trying to impress us.  The president of the college at the time (Forgot the name, but I think it started with a "V", Volglen, or something like that.) was cordial enough but seemed to be hiding something.  The preacher and I both left with the same feeling, but the young man went there anyway.  How he fares now, I do not know, but his brother travels around singing Gospel sons, and thinks he's Elvis Presley, apparently.  He "swallows" the microphone, and moves a lot while singing, "stretching" notes that do not require it.  Anyway, since things usually go downhill over time, I imagine they are not much today, as ukelele Mike already stated.  We did not hear their music then though.

Well, I have to say that the grace you demand be extended to Jack Hyles is certainly not evident in this post.  You met him and assumed he was hiding something...you both "felt" that...hmmmm.  And it's Voegtlin. Perfect man? Absolutely not.  But my point is that you don't even know him and you cast aspersion.  But, yet, you unequivocally state that those who DID know JH have no business "smearing" him.  By your own measuring stick, RVoegtlin has made a big impact and done a lot of good things, so you cannot, by your own application to JH critics, criticize him.  "They" may not be much today, but that, again, is aspersion AND opinion not based on solid fact known to you (yes, you said "I imagine", but my point, again, is that you blast people for their comments about things they KNOW about JH, but you do it without firsthand knowledge of "V".)  (and, honestly, why in the world would any college point out their failures?)

 

I will guarantee that if anyone who attended Fairhaven "swallows" their microphone, they did not learn it there.  Nor did he learn the moving and the stretching of notes there, either. (again, this is smearing a place, making it seem like the actions were learned at the place - which they were not)

 

Don't get me wrong. I'm not saying things are perfect at Fairhaven.  I'm not discrediting your impressions, either, nor throwing stones. I'm just calling out the inconsistency.

 

 

brosmith - I have no idea of what the music allowed in the dorms is.  I do know what the music standards for the dorm were when my hubby was in college.  We were married, so he was a town student, but we had some tapes that wouldn't pass approval, so we either got rid of them or put them away. Not because we had to, but because my husband felt that it would be good for us to align with the standards.  

 

I understand your objection to the drums.  But, honestly, the usage of the drums is consistent with good, solid music, and in no way is contemporary.  Many people do not like drums, but they are percussion instruments just as tambourines, cymbals, and even pianos are...Used in proper control they are not wrong.  And no-one who sits in our auditorium during services can truthfully say that our music is in any way contemporary.

 

I can just about guarantee that if the music at Fairhaven bothers you, there isn't a known college (by that, I mean one that most folk know about - BJU, Hyles, West Coast, Crown, etc) that you will approve of, based on music alone (leaving aside doctrinal issues, which also would be important).  And that's okay. She's your daughter and it is your responsibility to vet any college she would possibly attend.  No throwing of stones.  Truly.  (but a phone call might have gotten you more satisfaction?)

 

  BroMatt, you posted as I was typing this...I would not say that there are non-KJV materials in the bookstore.  The books brosmith referenced are biographies (for the most part). And in those bios, there are Bible verses.  The printers inserted non-KJV verses in the books.  It's a shame that they did, that, truly. But the books are not doctrinal books.  Again, they are mostly biographies (some are sermon books).  Reprinting the books in the original, swath, is cost prohibitive, even if one could get the original, and get the copyright permission to do so... (and, seriously "these folks?" "goats?" - why don't you call and find out if "these folks" really have given into the "goats?" 219-926-6636) The book mentioned (about Esther Kim) is an absolutely excellent book.  I read it years ago, and so do not remember non-KJV verses in it. (I'm not doubting you, brosmith, I just don't remember the verses.  But I do remember the amazing way God worked in her life).  Warning is posted so people know before they buy the books.  We are still KJV. And will continue to be so even under the new pastor.  (FYI, BroMatt - Dan is now dean of students...interesting side note - he was my student in 7th grade when I taught school in Belpre.)

 

 The bookstore is predominantly there for the church members. To provide good materials so there is no need to shop in charismatic bookstores where anything goes.  That doesn't mean it's not open to others, because it is - and it doesn't mean it's perfect, because it isn't.  But members know very definitely that non-KJV is not approved.  Any more than the sins of those in the biographies are approved; for instance - there are books about Billy Sunday in there. He was a great preacher - but his kids went to the devil, and he was a Presbyterian (that isn't the reason his kids went bad!). That doesn't mean that we approve of the Presbyterian church or kids going bad...Now, I would be the first to agree that if others use the bookstore, that puts a different slant on it.  But, again, caveat is posted. And needs to be heeded...

 

As to Patch - it still holds true today, BroMatt. But I don't know if they even sell Patch anymore at all. I haven't looked lately, but the last time I was in there, there were other kids materials and no Patch.  Some really good Bible verse CDs put to music.  All KJV verses, and solid music.

 

I'm not going to sit here and say that everything is absolutely without problem at Fairhaven.  But I honestly can't say there's another college I would recommend (and that's coming from someone who attended 4 different Bible colleges (and loved 'em all), and  personally knows about many things at several more...).  But there are correspondence courses, as was referenced in an earlier post.  That is something to be considered as well.  If you (generic you) are concerned about the doctrine or music of a college, and are hesitant about moving your family - or sending your child - then stay (or keep the kids home) in your home church, serve in the ministries there, and learn via correspondence. That way, if there is a doctrinal issue, your pastor would be there for you to discuss it with.  

 

FWIW - I don't know that, if I had a daughter, I would want to send her away to college.  I would want her to be further educated, but am not sure I would send her out of my home...Just my own thoughts, and NO reflection on the college our church has (honestly - the college does a bang-up job of teaching students - (I remember when Kita was there...I don't know if she's aware of this [probably not] how highly she was thought of.  When she and her hubby were getting ready to go to their first ministry position, one of the Asst. pastors told my hubby that she was going to be a great teacher [they liked Danny, too :uhhh: , but he isn't on the forum].  Suzi - that Asst. was Dr. B...).

 

As to the OP, I know that my hubby benefited from coming to college.  At the church where we met, the pastor said college wasn't necessary. He felt that he should be the one to train my hubby.  But I will just state this here: he was an egomaniac who not only had really bad doctrine, but he used intimidation to cow people (and by intimidation, I mean even physical violence if he felt it was "needed").  And so we left that church. And went to a church that had an institute.  My hubby attended it.  And that pastor had the same thoughts - he even said that if a person stayed in the church, they would know more doctrine than if they went to Bible college.  But that pastor had some issues as well. Not as bad as the previous, but I don't believe my hubby would be the man he is today had he not come to college.

 

It's been a long time since he graduated. We don't know what the Lord is doing, but we know He is working and - although it's longer than most - we are waiting on Him.  I do know that I believe my hubby would make one great pastor.  He is humble and loves the Lord with all his heart.  That's not something you learn in Bible college.  Or even your home church.  It's a work God has to do in your heart. And sometimes that takes time.  :blink:



#20 JerryNumbers

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 01:01 PM

I was adamantly opposed to ever being a pastor/preacher growing up, and even in my adult life. When I was preparing to transition out of the Navy, my wife jokingly said that I could become a pastor. My reply: "I do not EVER want to be a pastor!"

 

I had already made plans to move back to Texas, get my bachelors and masters in mechanical engineering, and pursue that as a career. We picked out a house, college, and even found a good church. Well, that was in October. In November, I attended a mens conference and it was there that God called me to preach. I'm not sure who was more surprised, me or my wife! Needless to say, we immediately scrapped our moving plans, and I started my training under my pastor. I currently serve as the Youth Director, and am still learning as much as I can.

 

Looking back I can see God guiding me in the direction to be a pastor in the 80's, & it seems maybe he was in my youth. But I feel it was only guiding me, & the time did not come until the 90's.

 

I know some will say they fought being called by God all of their life, until they finally gave in. Mine was not the least bit like that. Yet when he called me & I felt for sure it was a call from God, I sure did question him, & for the next 3 years I buried my face in the Bible studying wanting to be sure I was not mistaken. The morning I did so my wife said you've lost your mind. She has since seemed to have changed her mind.






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