Decades-Old 'blue Laws' Ban Thanksgiving Day Shopping In 3 States

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Decades-old 'blue laws' ban Thanksgiving Day shopping in 3 states

 

"Blue laws were once widespread throughout the country and are thought to date back to Colonial times, although some of the current regulations in Maine were instituted in the 1960s. The name may be derived from an 18th-century usage of blue meaning "rigidly moral," according to the Encyclopedia Brittanica."
 
The rules vary among the states. Retailers smaller than 5,000 square feet can operate in Maine, for example.
 
 
Here while back we discussed the 'Blue Laws' in one of our topics. Seems 3 states still has them in place somewhat.
 
And in the article it gives the meaning of 'Blue Law,' as meaning 'rigidly moral,' one thing for sure, the America way has taken up far from 'rigidly moral,' to a nation that has 'no morals' yet calms to while trying to kick God out of America.
 
Across our nation we still have a Thanksgiving yet for most it not about thanking God.

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Posted

 

Decades-old 'blue laws' ban Thanksgiving Day shopping in 3 states

 

"Blue laws were once widespread throughout the country and are thought to date back to Colonial times, although some of the current regulations in Maine were instituted in the 1960s. The name may be derived from an 18th-century usage of blue meaning "rigidly moral," according to the Encyclopedia Brittanica."
 
The rules vary among the states. Retailers smaller than 5,000 square feet can operate in Maine, for example.
 
 
Here while back we discussed the 'Blue Laws' in one of our topics. Seems 3 states still has them in place somewhat.
 
And in the article it gives the meaning of 'Blue Law,' as meaning 'rigidly moral,' one thing for sure, the America way has taken up far from 'rigidly moral,' to a nation that has 'no morals' yet calms to while trying to kick God out of America.
 
Across our nation we still have a Thanksgiving yet for most it not about thanking God.

 

 

I think Thanksgiving is good, although we don't have it in our country.  It seems that most Americans I speak to think of it as mainly a family get together.    

 

We have a Czech girl in our church who is studying at a local university and her church in Prague has Thanksgiving, but then her pastor is and American missionary.

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When I was a child nothing but the churches were open on Sunday or the main holidays. I can still remember when the next state over changed their laws and the little city nearest us started having stores open on Sunday's. It wasn't long before greed got the better of the politicians in this State and they changed our laws and our stores started opening on Sunday.

JerryNumbers likes this

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Same here, I liked it, all changes are not for the good.

 

I recall back in the 70's when running cross country many of the truck stops would be closed down on Holidays, plus there would not be as many trucks on the highway. And every time I passed a closed truck stop it made me a bit lonesome. Sometimes it would be a long way between truck stops that were open. It seemed when we hit the 80s that changed, & most of them started saying open during all Holidays.

 

During that time the only Holiday I usually got off for was Christmas. Just once in a long while things would hit so I could be off on one of the other Holidays.

 

Plus during that time nearly every Christmas afternoon several of our truck would leave out for the west coast trying to get  there quick, get unloaded, loaded back, & back home before New Years. Sometimes it worked, sometimes it did not & it took my smile off of my face when I didn't.

 

I still remember one New Year in the 70's when I thought I would make it the day before New Years Eve. The weather changed, & changed that. I hit snow & ice in New Mexico, in Texas it turned into black ice, & so I drove on snow & ice all the way to my house, a bit over 1,000 miles of it. At speeds of 20 to 40 MPH it sure is a slow go. I made it in mid-afternoon on New Years day.

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Where I grew up (Washington state), pharmacies were open, too. And some gas stations.  The ferries ran those days, too. I remember some Thanksgiving mornings getting into the car and going across the Sound by ferry to visit my grandparents.

 

It's interesting that Maine, one of the three that don't allow big box stores to be open, actually created those laws in the 60's.  

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