Christian Fellowship

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Posted

Do you know what the Temple Mount refers to? The Temple was on Mount Zion. He would have been casting Himself off the mountain in the act of casting Himself off the pinnacle of the Temple.

When an honestly mistaken man is confronted with the truth, he must cease being mistaken, or stop being honest.

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Posted

So it depends whether that particular pinnacle overlooked the interior of the temple mount or the exterior. If it was the exterior, it totally counts as a mountain. Since we aren't told, there's not much to argue about.

candlelight likes this

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Posted (edited)

So it depends whether that particular pinnacle overlooked the interior of the temple mount or the exterior. If it was the exterior, it totally counts as a mountain. Since we aren't told, there's not much to argue about.

So should man's ideas and supposed logic trump the word of God?

 

Is it not far easier to take the word of God as it stands?

 

Why is it so many today would rather make the Bible say what they want it to say, instead of taking it as it stands?

 

Is the Bible right or not?

Edited by AVBibleBeliever

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Posted (edited)

When one obviously is an expert at quoting scripture and a loving Christian he should be able consider the difference between a pinnacle and a mountain of unimportance and consider the intent of the poster.  I had no problem telling what the intent was.  I also did not consider that the difference between a pinnacle and a mountain was important enough to question the posters character.  One might consider this whole thing as making a mountain out of a mole hill.

 

God bless,

Larry

Edited by ThePilgrim
candlelight likes this

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Posted (edited)

So should man's ideas and supposed logic trump the word of God?

 

Is it not far easier to take the word of God as it stands?

 

Why is it so many today would rather make the Bible say what they want it to say, instead of taking it as it stands?

 

Is the Bible right or not?

 

The Bible's right, but it does not specify which particular pinnacle the devil took Christ too. If it was the pinnacle overlooking the court in front of temple - no mountain. If it was the pinnacle on the outer wall overlooking the Kidron Valley - well, anyone falling off it would pass not only the temple wall but also the cliffs before hitting bottom. You both could be right, and you both could be wrong. 

Edited by Salyan

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Posted

Whilst I think the whole thing here is a bit dumb, and the details are not important in this particular item, and the whole argument has become petty, the plain fact is that a mistake was made when it was referred to as a mountain - the mature thing to do would be to say "Oops, I made a mistake. I meant the temple. Sorry! But it still doesn't change the point."

Arbo and candlelight like this

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Posted

Modern Dictionaries define a pinnacle as being a turret. 

But many ancient dictionaries give an entirely different definition for the word.  For instance:

Bailey's 1726 Dictionary
PINNACLE [p:nacle, F. pinnacolo,
Ital. ot pinna, L.j the Battlement or
highest Top of a great Building or Spire ;
fguratively, Eminence or Height.

What was the highest pinnacle at the Temple?   Was it on the Temple itself?  Was it on the side of the mountain?  I believe it would have been where the most damage could have been done, hence the devil telling Jesus to throw Himself off.  That said, I believe it would have been on the side of the mountain.

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Posted

Also, we have the etymology of the word "pinnacle"
 

pinnacle (n.) dictionary.gif c.1300, "mountain, peak, promontory," from Old French pinacle "top, gable" (13c.) and directly from Late Latin pinnaculum "peak, pinnacle, gable," diminutive of Latin pinna "peak, point," (see pin (n.1)). Figurative use is attested from c.1400.

The etymology reveals pinnacle to be speaking of a mountain.

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Posted (edited)

And the Bible verses quite clearly says "pinnacle of the Temple".

It assigns directly the word pinnacle to the Temple itself.

But who cares - it was not about that....

Edited by DaveW

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Posted

Wow. This thread is supposed to be about Christian fellowship?  

 

Dumb doesn't even begin to describe it.  

 

 

:threadlockedbc5:

GraceSaved likes this

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