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#1 DaveW

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 10:10 AM

I have a want to make a pushbike out of marine grade plywood.

 

As a result, I will need to fix things like bottom brackets and steering shafts to the plywood.

 

Now, I am no woodworker - this is a part of my want to make things like the canoe mentioned previously.

 

So I have no idea what is required to bond a steel round shaft into the plywood frame.

 

For those who don't know, the bottom bracket is where the pedals go through - it is basically a pipe with a bearing at either end through which the pedal crankshaft passes, and the pedals are attached either end.

 

The steering shaft is the same basic thing, but it runs up and down.

 

I will also need to attach the rear wheel and gear shift derailleur into the rear frame - the rear wheel fits into a slot either side of the rear frame, so that will have to be reinforced somehow.

 

Does any of that make sense?

 

Any thoughts or ideas would be appreciated, but type slowly please - I know nothing about this stuff.

 

(I might just kill myself on this bike, considering the skills I currently have with woodworking :) )



#2 paid4

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 11:18 AM

Dave, I am not being mean or sarcastic here.

If you have not already bought the plywood then it's best to just buy a pushbike like you're wanting.

 

I say that from the experience of spending way more money trying to fix things that I should have just bought new in the first place. Plus working with marine plywood isn't the easiest thing to do.

 

This really isn't something to cut your teeth on when starting out woodworking.

 

Try this site for easy weekend projects or small builds if you feel the need to get into this or just want to build something.

 

http://www.woodsmithshop.com/

 

click the browse episodes button about middle way down then click on the project that looks interesting and build plans should appear with a short video of the episode in which it aired.

 

You may have to sign up but it's just email address and you get monthly free tips afterwards in your email but it's a good site.

 

Sorry i'm not much help. Remember safety is an issue as well.



#3 heartstrings

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 11:36 AM

I don't know if I'm visualizing your design right but here are a few suggestions...

 

This will mount the end of a threaded pipe to wood...

http://www.amazon.co.../dp/B007QUD6QWy

 

u bolts of the proper size might work to hold the side of a pipe....it's the same type thing that holds the rear axle to a truck

http://www.lowes.com...rue&Ntt=u bolts#!

 

a cable clamp might work too...

 

http://www.blairwire...amps/clamp2.jpg


Edited by heartstrings, 15 May 2014 - 11:39 AM.


#4 DaveW

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 07:59 PM

I will post up a preliminary concept plan if I can figure out how to.

 

Paid4 - I appreciate the advice, but the point is to make the thing, not buy it. And I can not afford to get welding stuff to make it out of alloy tube, and then learn and practice how to do it, and I kinda like the idea of wood. I already have a couple of bikes.

 

I will look at some "training projects" though - I was going to practice on something. Thanks for the link.

 

For some more detail, what I want to do is build a recumbent trike.

It will have a central spine upon which the pedal crank, idler gears, the seat, and the rear wheel will be mounted, 

This will be boxed in at a width of around 3".

 

To this will be attached a wing on either side, built up and framed with a top skin and bottom skin and some sort of "ribbing" within to strengthen it.

 

To each "wingtip" will be a "steering swivel" mounted. (The first units that HS linked may do this job).

 

For background, many years ago I did a lot of model airplane build ups, designed by me, and built with spar and frame wings - so the "general concept" of what I want is not unfamiliar to me. The scale and stresses involved are, hence the questions.

 

I expect A LOT of experimentation. And failures...... ;)

 

But considering I can use a single sheet of ply to cut all my frame parts, and any metal parts can simply be transferred to the "new frame" if need be, this means that I can make a complete frame for about $100 (not including lacquer, glue, etc)

 

Now a "shop bought" recumbent over here is not less than $1000, and many of them far more.

 

Get ready for a laugh...... (But remember that this is just a concept plan, and doesn't have all details.)

 

trike3.jpg trike3-side.jpg trike3-top.jpg



#5 DaveW

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 09:50 PM

I know it is a huge project to attempt.

 

I am also open to suggestions other than plywood.

 

I know that the Mosquito fighter-bomber of WW2 was made in large part of plywood, balsa, and aluminium foil, sandwiched and bonded together in such a way that it was able to take the stresses of aerial dogfighting - so making this trike should be possible - although maybe not possible for me. :)

 

So I now have two potential projects to work on - this one, and the canoe.

 

Now I just have to buy the plans for the canoe, finish the detail on the trike  (like how to steer it.....), find the time (and money) to actually do it, and somewhere in there develop the skills to actually do the job.

 

Piece of cake. :D

 

And thanks for that final advice - I will cut twice, stitch once, count everything and go "duh" a lot - an awful lot....... ;)



#6 heartstrings

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 10:00 PM

I have a want to make a pushbike out of marine grade plywood.

 

As a result, I will need to fix things like bottom brackets and steering shafts to the plywood.

 

Now, I am no woodworker - this is a part of my want to make things like the canoe mentioned previously.

 

So I have no idea what is required to bond a steel round shaft into the plywood frame.

 

For those who don't know, the bottom bracket is where the pedals go through - it is basically a pipe with a bearing at either end through which the pedal crankshaft passes, and the pedals are attached either end.

 

The steering shaft is the same basic thing, but it runs up and down.

 

I will also need to attach the rear wheel and gear shift derailleur into the rear frame - the rear wheel fits into a slot either side of the rear frame, so that will have to be reinforced somehow.

 

Does any of that make sense?

 

Any thoughts or ideas would be appreciated, but type slowly please - I know nothing about this stuff.

 

(I might just kill myself on this bike, considering the skills I currently have with woodworking :) )

Another way to mount an axle or shaft, besides u-bolts or cable clamps, would be a bearing called a "pillow block". A front bicycle wheel might work for that single wheel, just use big washers where the axle passes through the plywood for extra holding strength.


Edited by heartstrings, 15 May 2014 - 10:10 PM.


#7 DaveW

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 11:05 PM

Another way to mount an axle or shaft, besides u-bolts or cable clamps, would be a bearing called a "pillow block". A front bicycle wheel might work for that single wheel, just use big washers where the axle passes through the plywood for extra holding strength.

 

oooooohhhh - pillow block - now that looks like just the thing for the steering swivels - that is exactly the kind of stuff I was looking for - I can sort a mount block on the "wingtips" and work from there.

;)

 

I am having great fun planning and designing this thing - even if I never actually get the time to do it, it has been enjoyable so far.

 

I have to find a way to make time for some "hobby" type stuff - at the moment all my "downtime" is taken up with "taxi driving" and kids sport.



#8 Covenanter

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 12:54 AM

I suggest you are - :beatdeadhorse:

 

This design of vehicle may be more practical - 1sm237cowboy.gif



#9 paid4

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 06:34 AM

I know it is a huge project to attempt.

 

I am also open to suggestions other than plywood.

 

I know that the Mosquito fighter-bomber of WW2 was made in large part of plywood, balsa, and aluminium foil, sandwiched and bonded together in such a way that it was able to take the stresses of aerial dogfighting - so making this trike should be possible - although maybe not possible for me. :)

 

So I now have two potential projects to work on - this one, and the canoe.

 

Now I just have to buy the plans for the canoe, finish the detail on the trike  (like how to steer it.....), find the time (and money) to actually do it, and somewhere in there develop the skills to actually do the job.

 

Piece of cake. :D

 

And thanks for that final advice - I will cut twice, stitch once, count everything and go "duh" a lot - an awful lot....... ;)

I sure didn't know they were that expensive. Build away brother.

 

I would start with either heavy duty cardboard to cut out or really cheap luan (7mm plywood) sheet before comitting to the 3/4 stuff. Get your design cut out of the cheap stuff and you can kinda see what needs to be done without spending the big money on materials. Once you have the design made use the luan/cardboard for a template to cut out your stuff on the 3/4 plywood. Depending on what weight you want to haul you may be alright with 1/2" plywood depending on the design and jointery. I would however use a furniture grade plywood instead of marine grade. Just finish it with some polyurethane or shellac to waterproof. It would be much more pleasing to the eye. Good Luck and most importantly HAVE FUN. Woodworking is a stress reliever not a daunting task.



#10 DaveW

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 07:01 AM

I sure didn't know they were that expensive. Build away brother.

 

I would start with either heavy duty cardboard to cut out or really cheap luan (7mm plywood) sheet before comitting to the 3/4 stuff. Get your design cut out of the cheap stuff and you can kinda see what needs to be done without spending the big money on materials. Once you have the design made use the luan/cardboard for a template to cut out your stuff on the 3/4 plywood. Depending on what weight you want to haul you may be alright with 1/2" plywood depending on the design and jointery. I would however use a furniture grade plywood instead of marine grade. Just finish it with some polyurethane or shellac to waterproof. It would be much more pleasing to the eye. Good Luck and most importantly HAVE FUN. Woodworking is a stress reliever not a daunting task.

 

That sounds like great advice - I was going to make a scale model of it first (and still will), but a cardboard mock-up is a fantastic idea.

 

And yes, half the point is to find a way to relax and enjoy.



#11 candlelight

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 10:12 AM

What a good thread, brothers!  My dad and my uncle did work working as a hobby.  I was his tool girl.  Both men had all the equipment.  My dad made just about all of the furniture in my house growing up.  I have some of it.  He made a high chair for my son, as well, along with more furniture for his kids.  He also made wooden toys for his grandchildren, along with a what he called a pouting chair for my oldest niece.  She was a handful as a toddler.  He continued to work his job along with his other hobbies (wood working being his favorite) until he was put on Hospice for cancer.  

My uncle (his older brother) made are really cool dollhouse, which was the exact replica of their home, for his great granddaughters.  I remember it even had light switches, interesting moving doors, and a really nice shingled roof.  He did everything by hand.  He also made candle sticks and all kinds of cool things.  Too many things to remember.  I have his beautiful candlesticks along with a round folding bread basket.  He made furniture for his house, too.

My FIL works with wood, too.  He has made so many things over the years.  He and my husband, along with some other men in the church rebuilt our first church building twice.  My husband also loves to work with small wood.  He made me a large rectangular flower pot for Mother's Day.  He also made his mother a smaller one.  The flowers are in the pot, but I still need to put them in soil.  It has been a rainy season, with tornadoes and flooding.  I will plant them on Saturday.


Edited by candlelight, 16 May 2014 - 10:17 AM.


#12 heartstrings

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 10:13 AM

I suggest you are - :beatdeadhorse:

 

This design of vehicle may be more practical - 1sm237cowboy.gif

My two sons last weekend.......

 

https://fbcdn-sphoto...019020608_n.jpg


Edited by heartstrings, 16 May 2014 - 10:15 AM.





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