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Things Are Often Not As They Seem


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#1 2bLikeJesus

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 01:07 PM

I just got off the phone from a friend of mine from church.  My friend is a child psychologist and gets called to Elementary schools often to counsel "troubled" children.  He got a call from a school in conjunction with child protective services about a kindergarten child they considered dangerously troubled.   Here was the situation that had them convinced this child was going to be the next Columbine, or Sandy Hook perpetrator.

 

The children had a daily arts and crafts section of  time.  They noticed that almost every drawing this child turned in, regardless of it's theme, (sunny days, pets, gardens, etc.) was drawn with black crayon.  Trees..ground..even the sun was black.   Well this in their "professional" opinion was a sure indicator of a deeply troubled youth.

 

So in comes my child psychologist friend and after about 3 minutes of probing and asking questions he finds out that the Kindergarten teacher in an effort to help teach the students their alphabet, always had the kids line up in alphabetical order to get their crayons at craft supplies.  He said, "my last name is Zysk" and by the time I got to the crayons, the white and black ones were the only whole ones left, and I couldn't draw pictures on white paper with a white crayon, so I have to use black.

 

Our imaginations can cause so much needless trouble.   Whenever you "imagine" you know "just how that person feels" please check yourself and simply  communicate with that person.

 

Bro. Garry



#2 Salyan

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 01:42 PM

I hope someone said something to that kindergarten teacher! How frustrating for a child to always have to be the last one at picking their crayons.



#3 paid4

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 01:58 PM

That's sad but I can't stop myself from chuckling inside.

 

The wisdom of men!!!

 

Well I guess everyone has to have job security!!



#4 ThePilgrim

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 02:05 PM

I hope someone said something to that kindergarten teacher! How frustrating for a child to always have to be the last one at picking their crayons.

Yeah, if they lined em up by their height though, the short kid would have been the one with the black crayon.  

Why is it that teachers and officialdom in general feel they must categorize everything and everybody?  Well, I suppose treating children as nothing more than numbers or parts of the alphabet is to make it easy on themselves.  But in making it easy for one person you by necessity must make it harder for someone else.  I suppose it is okay to categorize rocks after all they are hard as rocks.  Children however are not. 

My solution?  I have no idea!  :th_wellduh:

 

God bless,

Larry



#5 No Nicolaitans

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 02:15 PM

I just got off the phone from a friend of mine from church.  My friend is a child psychologist and gets called to Elementary schools often to counsel "troubled" children.  He got a call from a school in conjunction with child protective services about a kindergarten child they considered dangerously troubled.   Here was the situation that had them convinced this child was going to be the next Columbine, or Sandy Hook perpetrator.

 

The children had a daily arts and crafts section of  time.  They noticed that almost every drawing this child turned in, regardless of it's theme, (sunny days, pets, gardens, etc.) was drawn with black crayon.  Trees..ground..even the sun was black.   Well this in their "professional" opinion was a sure indicator of a deeply troubled youth.

 

So in comes my child psychologist friend and after about 3 minutes of probing and asking questions he finds out that the Kindergarten teacher in an effort to help teach the students their alphabet, always had the kids line up in alphabetical order to get their crayons at craft supplies.  He said, "my last name is Zysk" and by the time I got to the crayons, the white and black ones were the only whole ones left, and I couldn't draw pictures on white paper with a white crayon, so I have to use black.

 

Our imaginations can cause so much needless trouble.   Whenever you "imagine" you know "just how that person feels" please check yourself and simply  communicate with that person.

 

Bro. Garry

 

 

Can I share this Bro. Garry?



#6 HappyChristian

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 02:35 PM

I'm still scratching my head as to why the kids didn't have their own crayons...

 

Thanks for sharing this, 2bL...this kind of nonsense has gone on for too long.  For years, now, too many "experts" have tried to make it a big deal if coloring with mainly/only black.  Even if this child didn't always get the leftover crayons, many young kids choose black over other colors just simply because they do - no hidden anger, no hatred, no troubled psyches.  SMH at the silliness of those who are supposed to be training children.



#7 2bLikeJesus

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 02:47 PM

Absolutely you can share that, NN.  



#8 Standing Firm In Christ

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 03:11 PM

Simple solution:  School spends $25.00 at local Arts Supply on much needed boxes of crayons.



#9 HappyChristian

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 03:15 PM

Simpler solution: kids have their own crayons.  :biggrin:



#10 Winman

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 03:27 PM

People are afraid and terrified of anyone who is just a little bit different, and assume the very worst about them.

 

Happens all the time. 



#11 John81

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 06:29 PM

Teachers have become de facto agents of the State. They are required by law to continually be on the lookout for "trouble", which is very broadly defined. Along with this they are under threat of possible severe consequences should they not only fail to report something, but even if they fail to notice something.

 

If a person is constantly looking for a problem, they are going to see one. While some teachers would have the maturity, wisdom and intestinal fortitude to better deal with such things, many don't. They either live in fear of missing something or they develop a thrill in the "hunt".

 

The government works hard to prevent parents from being good parents while trying to prevent children from being children, while at the same time holding both to standards of perfection they have created in their own warped minds.

 

Indeed, odd that the children can't have their own crayons.

 

When I was in school there was one teacher who used to often order us alphabetically for things but she never used the A to Z approach each time. She would mix in Z to A and sometimes start in the middle and go one way or the other. At least that way no one was always last or first and everyone rotated near the front or back.



#12 DaveW

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 07:00 PM

A similar one from years into my past.
A kid would only ever use one colour in his artwork at High School.
Try as they might he just refused to. Occasionally he would use two but rarely - no NEVER - did he use the full range of colours.
He was getting in trouble for disobedience etc, but mostly they were concerned with why he refused to use the full range of colours.

Turns out that he was severely colour blind and most of the colours looked the same to him.

His artwork was great by the way, just mostly one colour - not always the same colour - he would just pick one and do everything like a lead pencil drawing, shading and toning to perfection - all in one colour.

how do you get to 15 without anyone figuring that out?

#13 John81

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 07:36 PM

When I was in kindergarten I mostly used red for everything simply because I liked that colour. I would colour cats, horses and most things red. My teacher thought it was funny. She asked me why and I told her and that was it.

 

I suppose these days they might suspect a child of being an animal abuser or killer for colouring them red, the colour of blood. Oh, my!



#14 ThePilgrim

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 07:51 PM

When I was in grade school (Didn't have kindergarten in Dayville, Or. during the war) my favorite drawing subjects were soldiers, warplanes, and cowboys.  Lots of guns, tanks, artillery, and bombs.  I suppose if I were at the same school age today they would have me in the Oregon State Penitentiary prisoner education program.  I don't suppose that would be all bad though, maybe I could study criminal law and become a criminal lawyer (or is that lawyer criminal).  They would at least have had me on Ritalin or something else just as helpful to a young boy's psyche.

 

God bless,

Larry



#15 2bLikeJesus

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 07:51 PM

When I was in kindergarten for some reason I was fascinated by spiders.  I thought they were the coolest things on earth, and almost all my pictures had at least one spider in them.  Why I never grew up to be an arachnologist I will never know.  Maybe it was because my mother and sister kept making my captured study specimens, wet spots.  By the time I was 8 years old though I had found a new passion that was much more acceptable to the ladies in my home, and that was baseball and I confess I am still fascinated by it to this day.  



#16 John81

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 08:04 PM

During recess we used to play cops and robbers, cowboys and Indians, war, holding our fingers like guns and making shooting sounds. Today they expel children from school for such play and they are marked as a potential danger; or worse.



#17 Covenanter

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 04:17 AM

Lovely story, with a moral! I wonder how much the official solution cost, compared with buying enough crayons!

 

While I never got into trouble for it, my favourite drawing implement was black pencil - because I wanted detail. I couldn't get on with charcoal or brush because they were so imprecise. In WWII I drew on anything white - envelopes, food & cigarette packets, etc.



#18 Doc Flay

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 08:17 AM

My father told me when he was in school, they had a project to cut out paper dolls. The instructions were "just follow the line" well that worked good until he got to the neck line of the dress and accidentally cut off the doll's head. The teachers response was not to call a psychoanalyst  but to hall off and smack him right across the face.



#19 John81

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 08:47 AM

No wonder he remembers that!



#20 Covenanter

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 08:57 AM

We noticed our table cloth had been cut - very neatly along the pattern lines. One of our boys, & a pair of scissors.






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