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How Are Things In Some Places?


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#1 ThePilgrim

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 09:44 AM

I am not making excuses for anybody, just saying how things are.

 

"Of the 60 courts St. Louis County municipal courts observed by ArchCity, 30 were accused of engaging in illegal or harmful practices. “Three courts, Bel-Ridge, Florissant, and Ferguson, were chronic offenders and serve as prime examples of how these practices violate fundamental rights of the poor, undermine public confidence in the judicial system, and create inefficiencies,” according to the report.
 
The paper points out that in Ferguson, 86 percent of vehicle stops “involved a black motorist, although blacks make up just 67 percent of the population.” In addition, blacks stopped in Ferguson “are almost twice as likely as whites to be searched (12.1 percent versus 6.9 percent) and twice as likely to be arrested (10.4 percent versus 5.2 percent)”. Searches of blacks only results in discovery of contraband 21.7 percent of the time, whereas contraband is recovered from their less frequently stopped white counterparts 34.0 percent of the time.
 
Municipalities’ seeming willigness to profit off of minorities has undoubtedly fueled the flames ignited by Brown’s shooting. One resident quoted in the study said, “It’s ridiculous how these small municipalities make their lifeline off the blood of the people who drive through the area.”
 
Twenty-two percent of Ferguson residents live below the poverty line, and 21.7 percent receive food stamps. The unemployment rate in the town is 14.3 percent, or more than double that of St. Louis County and Missouri as a whole. 
 
“Despite Ferguson’s relative poverty, fines and court fees comprise the second largest source of revenue for the city, a total of 2,635,400,” according to the ArchCity Defenders report. And in 2013, the Ferguson Municipal Court issued 24,532 arrest warrants and 12,018 cases, “or about 3 warrants and 1.5 cases per household.”
 
Exacerbating the problem, the report says, are "a number of operational procedures that make it even more difficult for defendants to navigate the courts." A Ferguson court employee reported, for example, that “the bench routinely starts hearing cases 30 minutes before the appointed time and then locks the doors to the building as early as five minutes after the official hour, a practice that could easily lead a defendant arriving even slightly late to receive an additional charge for failure to appear.”
 
Thomas Harvey, co-founder and executive director of ArchCity Defenders and one of the paper’s authors, says that residents’ perception that the system is unfairly stacked against them gives important context for the depth of the present outrage.
 
“There are 90 municipalities in St. Louis County that range from 12 people to 50,000 people. Eighty-six of them have their own courts. They have their own police forces,” he explains. “What ends up being the product of all that is just a low-level sense of harassment on a daily basis. The clients that we represent feel that. It’s palpable for them.”
 
“They resent it because it’s not about public safety,” he adds. “These aren’t violent criminals. These are poor people.”"
 
Full article here:


#2 John81

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 05:55 PM

There is no doubt that most city judicial systems are corrupt to one extent or another. It's also a known fact that cities, counties, States use the law and fines as a means of generating revenue. It would take a virtual house cleaning to change that.

 

While the statistics above do give some facts, that's not the whole picture. Often in these urban areas it's young black males who are committing about 90% of the major crimes regardless of the overall percentage of blacks in that particular urban area. This, rather naturally, leads to more blacks being stopped by police, searched, arrested, etc.

 

Do some cops fall into the mindset of viewing most young black males as likely criminals? Certainly. In some cases they probably have good reason. Yet there are always those who take matters to an extreme and actually target young black males without probable cause. Interestingly, other statistics I've seen in the past indicate that black police officers, and not only white cops, also do this.

 

As other reports have indicated, while there used to be high standards needed to become a cop, that's no longer the case. In many areas of the country they scrape the bottom of the barrel just to have enough cops. It's little wonder there are many unethical cops out there today.

 

We, as Christians, also have to keep in mind that just like the criminals, most cops are lost sinners too. While in different ways, both are servants of their father the devil.

 

As a society we've dropped most of the moral and ethical standards for being a police officer yet we still expect the police to be on some higher level.

 

Two State police officers blew the whistle here a year or two ago over the State government constantly ordering the State police to raise revenues by sending several units into small towns to nab as many little old ladies driving to the local store or post office without their seat belts.

 

First, it's terrible the politicians ordering such actions. Diverting the State police from serious State duties all for the sake of raising money because the politicians have wasted what they already had.

 

Second, it's terrible the leadership of the State police went along with this.

 

Third, it's terrible most all State police officers went along with this.

 

Fourth, it's terrible that the two State police officers who exposed this illegal activity (it's illegal to use the State police in such a way) were both fired.

 

Fifth, it's terrible the "justice system" played the game and prevented the fired officers from seeking justice in the courts.



#3 HappyChristian

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 09:55 PM

I'm glad to say that the police in our town aren't bottom of the barrel. Our chief is a Christian. And he's got good men.

However, I'm not happy that there are MRAPs in neighboring communities to be shared by several counties...including ours.

#4 Miss Daisy

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 10:47 PM

I object to the statement regarding that cops are the bottom of the barrel. Qualifying to be a cop, sheriff's deputy, or conservation officer in Illinois is very difficult to even be good enough to make it to the academy, only the best make it. It may be different in other states but despite our corrupt government there are those who do have to QUALIFY for a job, not just make good speeches to be elected.



#5 John81

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 07:16 AM

I didn't say all cops are from the bottom of the barrel. What I was saying is they have dropped the moral and ethical requirements so that today we have far more cops with poor or even bad morals and ethics. These still have to pass the physical and other requirements to become police officers, but that doesn't change their moral character.

 

Being in rural America it's less of a problem, but still there to an extent, but the larger the city it's typical to find worse men who are cops.

 

Simply becoming a police officer and putting on a uniform doesn't make one a good person any more than attending seminary and becoming a pastor and putting on a suit makes one a good man of God.

 

Whatever ones profession, if they are lost, and especially if they have a low moral compass, they are tools of the devil and given the high temptation environment many serve in, it's little wonder some go from bad to worse.

 

In Illinois, the Chicago police department is known to be very corrupt. There have been many problems with the State police force in Illinois. I don't know about sheriffs departments or small town cops there, as it's harder to find news stories on them.

 

There are some good cops, even some Christian cops. Praise God for them!! Unfortunately, they take heat and suffer because of the many corrupt cops.

 

Again, one can't really expect a lost man to be anything other than a lost man regardless of his profession.



#6 prophet1

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 07:53 AM

One of the reasons for the moral vacuum among officers recruited in the last 20 years, is the nature of the psychological exam that they are given. In '96, a fellow Marine, co-worker, chidhood friend, and Christian, Jose, applied for the local police force. The day he took the test, he told me that he was afraid that he would fail it, due to the obvious bias the psychological part had against believers. He was right. They failed him. Here was a USMC Corporal, still in active Reserves, who couldn't be a police officer, because he didnt have a "healthy suspicion of overly religious people".

Edited by prophet1, 21 August 2014 - 07:54 AM.


#7 John81

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 08:05 AM

A friend I went to school with had a similar experience. He joined the Marines right out of high school, then transferred to the Army upon reenlistment and spent many years of service in Germany. Upon leaving the military he moved to Illinois, planning to become a State trooper. He was rejected by the same biased system.



#8 prophet1

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 08:09 AM

They, in preparation for the end times, have weeded out those who would be sympathetic to Christ.

#9 John81

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 08:19 AM

Yes, and it's not just the police, this sort of thing is occurring in the military too. The pressure is on to weed out "non-conformists" and to label Christians, constitutionalists, traditional patriots, and the like as radicals and threats.



#10 Miss Daisy

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 03:53 PM

I didn't know about the psychological exam that wasn't friendly to Christians. But that makes sense. I've only known one cop who was a true Christian, sadly.


Edited by Miss Daisy, 21 August 2014 - 03:53 PM.





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