heartstrings

Woodworking

41 posts in this topic

I started woodworking in 9th or 10th grade then ramped it up quite a bit after I was married and began to acquire more tools.. I made this rocking horse for our daughter, who was two at the time, and used my Dad's old meatcutting bandsaw to cut it out. There was a ton of rasping and sanding with hand tools to do afterwards but it was finally finished. I built several and sold them after that. Fast-forward about 25 years and I've made one for each of the three grandchildren. One more grandchild is on the way and, Lord willing, he will get one too. I now use my CNC to cut them out, which saves a lot of time. This is the first horse, sitting on the CNC, after I refinished it. It now sits in our living room for the grands to ride when they come over.

 

rocking horse 1 (2).jpg

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This is my eldest grandson on one of the new ones, designed/vectorized in one of my CAD programs, and routed out on the CNC.

AARON ROCKING.JPG

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1 minute ago, Brother Stafford said:

CNC? I thought this was about woodworking.

Why keep riding the horse, when you can drive the new Chevy? :)

I still have to edge-sand, hand-route the edges, belt-sand the flats, stain, lacquer, screw the parts together and all that. I know that I could still do the rest the old way, but why?

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The cavities for the yarn "tail" and mane also have to be done the old way. I drill the tail cavity with a spade bit, cut the yarn to length, wrap it tightly at one end, shoot some hot glue intot he cavity and jam the yarn in with a screwdriver. You can pull on it till your eyes pop out and can't get it to pull out....but a KID can do it LOL. 

The mane cavity can be done with a rabbeting bit and a router. The handgrip, in the neck, was drilled with a drillpress. See....it's still woodworking. :)

rockinghorses.JPG

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9 minutes ago, heartstrings said:

Why keep riding the horse, when you can drive the new Chevy? :)

I still have to edge-sand, hand-route the edges, belt-sand the flats, stain, lacquer, screw the parts together and all that. I know that I could still do the rest the old way, but why?

If you have to ask the question, I don't know how I can answer you.

2 minutes ago, heartstrings said:

The mane cavity can be done with a rabbeting bit and a router. The handgrip, in the neck, was drilled with a drillpress. See....it's still woodworking.

It sounds like you're enjoying yourself, and it definitely looks like your grandson is enjoying them, but it's not woodworking; it's machining and programming.  Nothing wrong with machining and programming, but we need to call a spade a spade.

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Posted (edited)

3 minutes ago, heartstrings said:

I prefer the Chevy Silverado crew cab...........loaded :)

That's great!  But don't go for a drive in your truck and say your going horseback riding.  It confuses us equestrians. ;)

(check and mate)

Edited by Brother Stafford

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The one I built for my youngest grandson this Christmas

alexander horse.jpg

3 minutes ago, Brother Stafford said:

That's great!  But don't go for a drive in your truck and say your going horseback riding.  It confuses us equestrians. ;)

(check and mate)

Yeah whatever :)

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Posted (edited)

25 minutes ago, heartstrings said:

Nice!

Cords are aggravating aren't they.

They can be major or minor problems on varying scales.  The trick is to stay composed, don't lose your tempo and conduct yourself appropriately.

(ba doom...tssshhh!)

Edited by Brother Stafford

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9 minutes ago, heartstrings said:

It's best to note: chords are the key to making such maladies............

What if when God told Noah to coat the ark with pitch, Noah replied, "B♯, right Lord?"  "No, Noah," replied the Lord, "I said to make sure that your tools be sharp."

Never mind, now I'm just being a retard.

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2 hours ago, Brother Stafford said:

What if when God told Noah to coat the ark with pitch, Noah replied, "B♯, right Lord?"  "No, Noah," replied the Lord, "I said to make sure that your tools be sharp."

Never mind, now I'm just being a retard.

You B#? I C.

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Posted (edited)

Just finished edge-sanding, belt sanding and edge routing this today. CNC cut from a big'ol board of solid Western Red Cedar my neighbor gave to me..

0308171625.jpg

0316171623.jpg

I'll do some block-sanding on the top and edges, clean up and sand at the neck joint, then I'll probably spray several coats of clear lacquer.

0316171622a.jpg

Edited by heartstrings

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Then I might apply this image under a clear acrylic pick guard which I'll also make on the CNC. I'll probably just buy a new maple neck to go on it along with some decent electronics.

think3d pickguard.jpg

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Very nice work Heartstrings.  I commend you on sticking with your love of wood.  I tinker here and there but nothing as wonderful as you have shown here.  I was under the impression that CNC machines were typically mills, lathes etc.  never thought of them as being saws as well.  or is your CNC a giant router perhaps.  Mind showing a picture?  does it operate off of a computer program as I am assuming? 

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Posted (edited)

Here's the prototype of a body I designed for one of the instruments I used to make.  It's from when I still used machines.  I would freehand guide the piece around my bandsaw. Is still has the router template on top for the hand held plunge router.  Then I wold freehand guide the body past a  1/4" roundover bit on my router table.  The neck above was hand carved with a spokeshave, rasps and files.

new-body-template.jpg

You can see it together here and that the prototype was made out of plywood.

50-cal-prototype.jpg

Here's a promotional photo of me holding one of my guitars in front of one of my banners

brian-standing-50-cal.jpg

And here's a photo of the front of one of them.  This was the ".50 caliber" model.

50-cal-front.jpg

And here's the back

50_cal_back.jpg

I owned this company (SmokeBox Instruments) when I sustained the damage to my ears.  I was also working in the operations department of Guitar Center, which was where the incident happened that caused my hearing damage.  I was also playing gigs in bars and local concert venues at this time as well.

I have since disavowed every aspect of that part of my life and now understand that lifestyle, and everything associated with that music was godless and sinful; even the country, bluegrass and rockabilly Gospel music that I thought was righteous.

Edited by Brother Stafford

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Brother Stafford, ever make ukuleles? I would love to try but I have no shop, nor money to build one at this point-my goats eat everything, all my green. I have some slabs of purple heart wood I wanted to use but of course, no tools to cut that hard stuff.

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25 minutes ago, Ukulelemike said:

Brother Stafford, ever make ukuleles? I would love to try but I have no shop, nor money to build one at this point-my goats eat everything, all my green. I have some slabs of purple heart wood I wanted to use but of course, no tools to cut that hard stuff.

Yes, I made ukuleles, but, as I said above, I no longer associate with that sort of music.

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Wow! Very nice work! Maple?

Those star fretmarkers and the gold hardware are a nice touch. I thought about doing one of my own profile design too, but keeping the Telecaster layout.

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18 minutes ago, heartstrings said:

Wow! Very nice work! Maple?

Thank you for the compliment. The fretboard and neck were flame maple, the inlaid stars were bocote and the body was swamp ash.  The tailpiece was an American Bigsby, it had a Schaller roller bridge, Lollar '52 Tele single coil pickups, Grover tuners, nitro-cellulose tortoise pickguard, custom made brass SBI headstock coin/truss rod cover/neck plate/serial plates and Honey-burst lacquer finish.

It's all gone now.  Aside from not being able to hear right anymore, I couldn't justify my faith with making things like that anymore.

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Posted (edited)

6 hours ago, Orval said:

Very nice work Heartstrings.  I commend you on sticking with your love of wood.  I tinker here and there but nothing as wonderful as you have shown here.  I was under the impression that CNC machines were typically mills, lathes etc.  never thought of them as being saws as well.  or is your CNC a giant router perhaps.  Mind showing a picture?  does it operate off of a computer program as I am assuming? 

Thank you so much. I'm really not that crazy about woodworking anymore, but I do it as the need arises. My son wanted me to make a Telecaster, so I'm building this one to practice on and I'll use it for a sample in my showroom. There are many forms of CNC machines like the ones you mentioned as well as lasers, waterjets, routers, plasma cutters, and pretty much any kind of robotic manufacturing machine controlled by a computer. The one I used here is a router. Most often I use it to cut all kinds of plastics, composites and sometimes metals. Mine just runs off an old WinXP computer.

 

For some reason, this video was corrupted, but I think you can see it...

 

I have a home-made CNC machine I built last year. I will post photos later in another thread.

Edited by heartstrings

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