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Whats for Supper...

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I had wild pacific salmon fillet (not wild when I got it from the freezer in Sainsbury, but that is what it said on the packet.)  With  steamed baby potatoes and runner beans, roast Parsnip, butternut, carrot and red onions.  

Edited by Invicta

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On 30/08/2017 at 3:14 PM, Jim_Alaska said:

OK, the key to perfection is uniformity. In this case uniformity is in the form of every vegetable, except one, cut to as close to the same size as possible. Size depends of personal preference, but in every preference, all the same size.

I start with a large rectangular Pyrex baking dish with low sides.

I like a variety of fresh veggies, but you can use as few or as many as you like.

 

A bit late in replying Jim,  but I did roast veggies today served with a chicken  breast portion.  I add salt and pepper a little finely ground Herbes de Provence and a touch of ground garlic with a good sprinkling of olive oil.  I used to use Pyrex for potatoes but found that they stuck to it.  We now use Black non stick pans as they don't stick and it aids browning.  

(Black pans also aid defrosting frozen things, the thicker the better.  I remember doing an experiment in school where we tested the heating and cooling of Black, white and two shades of grey, and the black came out tops in all cases.)

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5 hours ago, Jim_Alaska said:

I don't understand Invicta,, how is it possible to have left over chicken breast?  :4_6_2v:

I am old and don't have a big appetite these days. I got a large chicken cooked it and put some in the fridge, and froze some, I am the only one in our family that eats meat. I don't like buying the cheaper chickens in supermarkets, but the free range ones from farms  are too expensive for me. I do have one rarely as a treat.  They put so much water into supermarket chickens it dilutes the flavour.

About  40 years ago I watched a programme on TV called What Do You Eat?.  One of the Items was how much water there is in processed food.  They visited a chicken processing factory, and showed then injecting chickens with, I think it was called called polyphosphates or something, they then dropped them into a water bath.  They said it is legal but they should meter it and they didn't. They asked why they they did it and the reply was "The customers like it because it makes the chicken more succulent." the presenter said "It was more likely the they can sell water as chicken."   They do it in all other meats as well.

When my mum roasted a joint of meat and poured out the juices, she got a bowl full of fat with just  little Jelly at the bottom.  Now we get a  bowlful of liquid with just a little fat on top. 

They also tested canned ham.  The one with most water in it was the leading brand Ye Olde Oak Ham. which had 27% water.  They said the process must have some water, but that was excessive. The can said it was in natural jelly, but it wasn't natural it was water. 

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1 hour ago, Invicta said:

I am old and don't have a big appetite these days. I got a large chicken cooked it and put some in the fridge, and froze some, I am the only one in our family that eats meat. I don't like buying the cheaper chickens in supermarkets, but the free range ones from farms  are too expensive for me. I do have one rarely as a treat.  They put so much water into supermarket chickens it dilutes the flavour.

About  40 years ago I watched a programme on TV called What Do You Eat?.  One of the Items was how much water there is in processed food.  They visited a chicken processing factory, and showed then injecting chickens with, I think it was called called polyphosphates or something, they then dropped them into a water bath.  They said it is legal but they should meter it and they didn't. They asked why they they did it and the reply was "The customers like it because it makes the chicken more succulent." the presenter said "It was more likely the they can sell water as chicken."   They do it in all other meats as well.

When my mum roasted a joint of meat and poured out the juices, she got a bowl full of fat with just  little Jelly at the bottom.  Now we get a  bowlful of liquid with just a little fat on top. 

They also tested canned ham.  The one with most water in it was the leading brand Ye Olde Oak Ham. which had 27% water.  They said the process must have some water, but that was excessive. The can said it was in natural jelly, but it wasn't natural it was water. 

My wife and I are always amazed (and not in a good way) at the size of chicken breasts at Wal Mart. Some of them look like they should be turkey breasts. It's kind of scary thinking what all they are feeding those chickens (and then injecting them with) to make them so large. The ones at our local supermarket aren't much different either.

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4 hours ago, Invicta said:

I am old and don't have a big appetite these days. I got a large chicken cooked it and put some in the fridge, and froze some, I am the only one in our family that eats meat. I don't like buying the cheaper chickens in supermarkets, but the free range ones from farms  are too expensive for me. I do have one rarely as a treat.  They put so much water into supermarket chickens it dilutes the flavour.

About  40 years ago I watched a programme on TV called What Do You Eat?.  One of the Items was how much water there is in processed food.  They visited a chicken processing factory, and showed then injecting chickens with, I think it was called called polyphosphates or something, they then dropped them into a water bath.  They said it is legal but they should meter it and they didn't. They asked why they they did it and the reply was "The customers like it because it makes the chicken more succulent." the presenter said "It was more likely the they can sell water as chicken."   They do it in all other meats as well.

When my mum roasted a joint of meat and poured out the juices, she got a bowl full of fat with just  little Jelly at the bottom.  Now we get a  bowlful of liquid with just a little fat on top. 

They also tested canned ham.  The one with most water in it was the leading brand Ye Olde Oak Ham. which had 27% water.  They said the process must have some water, but that was excessive. The can said it was in natural jelly, but it wasn't natural it was water. 

Yes, I understand Invicta. To my mind water injection of meat is totally deceptive and its only purpose is increased profit. Ham has long been known as one of the easiest meats to be injected and is not even noticed by most people.

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One of our TV chefs, Jamie Oliver, who has had a campaign in our country to get school meals to have more healthy menus.   He had some success but when he went to US he was banned from attending any schools in some states.  He did attend one in what he said was the most obese city in the most obese state in the most obese country in the world.  He didn't say which as far as I can remember, but he did visit one school class of 6 year olds and held up a number of common vegetables and asked what they were, and not one could recognise any of them, even a potato. They didn't even know that chips/fries com from potatoes.  

He did visit a family and asked what they ate and they said pizza and chips/fries. He looked in their freezer and it was stuffed full of these. The 12 year old was really large and took the family for a health check at the local hospital.  He said they had never had a check up, and he said he did not understand the US school system but he could not understand how a 12 year old had never had a checkup. When they got to the hospital the Dr. immediately said he thought the 12 year old had diabetes. but after checks he said he hadn't but if he didn't change his diet he soon would have. Not getting at you over there but that is what was reported. 

I noticed over the time I have posted on this thread, very few of us have mentioned having vegetables. Vegetables give vitamins, different vitamins from meat. We try to have a balance of protein and vegetables.  I have meat for protein and my wife has cheese, pulses, egg and milk products.

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11 hours ago, Jim_Alaska said:

I don't understand Invicta,, how is it possible to have left over chicken breast?  :4_6_2v:

Sorry Jim, I had leftover chicken again for lunch today. Roast vegetables, Carrot, butternut, celeriac, parsnip. steamed baby potatoes and green beans. 

We will have salad for supper.  

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I had Roast Beef yesterday, leftover Roast Beef today, and guess what?  I just found out that we are having  Roast Beef at our seniors lunch tomorrow.

Today  Roast Beef with Dijon style potatoes Steamed carrot and green beans,  

Dijon potatoes are sliced and precooked (steamed in my case), then added finely chopped shallots, chervil and chives, in cream with Dijon Mustard and lemon juice topped with grated cheese and baked for ½ hour or so, until brown on top.

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Today's dinner sounds wonderful Invicta. I'll have to try the potatoes cooked like that some time.

Tonight we are having roast chicken thighs with drumsticks attached. My wife found an excellent way to cook them so that it takes less time and does not have the tendency to dry them out from roasting. She fully cooks them in the micro wave and then puts them in the over to brown for an hour. The cooking in the micro wave goes very quickly. i can't remember just how long she cooks them that way, but it seems fast.

Like I said once before, "I never met a chicken I didn't like."    

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This morning I seared some cube steaks and made gravy. Then I put the gravy and meat in the crockpot, so it's been cooking for almost 6 hours. Potatoes and green beans are cooking right now (not in the same pot), and we'll have a little bit of salad as well.  Yum, yum!

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Chicken leg and thigh, first cooked in a pressure cooker, then roasted to brown it. Also having beet greens for a veggie. These are cooking now.

The pressure cooker idea is new, as is the pressure cooker my wife just bought. It is a counter top model that has its own electric plate inside of it. I had never seen any kind except the ones that go on the stove top. It has different settings for different degrees of tenderness. Quite a difference from the older ones. I'll let you know how this works out.

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OK, so here is the report on the new pressure cooker. First off I have to  correct the vegetable we had, it was not beet greens, it was collard greens. I have to say that they were the best I have ever had. My wife cooked them in the new cooker with chopped onions, a dash of cooking oil and a dash of chicken broth. They came out so tender and flavorful that it was hard to believe the difference from how they are normally cooked.

The chicken leg and thigh cooked in the new cooker is going to take some experimenting to get it right. It didn't come out like she planned so she finished it off in the oven. All in all it was a delicious dinner and the collard greens really enhanced the experience.

I'm not much of a guy for veggies, although when I have them I tend to like very strong tasting veggies, like collard greens beet greens, spinach and kale. I do like corn, but don't care for green beans in any form, or any kind of squash, carrots or parsnips.

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1 hour ago, Jim_Alaska said:

OK, so here is the report on the new pressure cooker. First off I have to  correct the vegetable we had, it was not beet greens, it was collard greens. I have to say that they were the best I have ever had. My wife cooked them in the new cooker with chopped onions, a dash of cooking oil and a dash of chicken broth. They came out so tender and flavorful that it was hard to believe the difference from how they are normally cooked.

The chicken leg and thigh cooked in the new cooker is going to take some experimenting to get it right. It didn't come out like she planned so she finished it off in the oven. All in all it was a delicious dinner and the collard greens really enhanced the experience.

I'm not much of a guy for veggies, although when I have them I tend to like very strong tasting veggies, like collard greens beet greens, spinach and kale. I do like corn, but don't care for green beans in any form, or any kind of squash, carrots or parsnips.

Seems you mostly dislike those I like and vice versa. I do like Kale though. and that Italian kind, but I can't remember its name, something Nero.I don't like beet greens, or Chard, I have not heard of Collard greens. We do have a number of Collard Doves visiting our garden, but I don't expect they are related.

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