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Flourgirl

Whats for Supper...

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6 hours ago, Jim_Alaska said:

The doves may not be related, but may be very tasty.  :15_yum:

They may be a bit small.  We also  have wood pigeons in the garden, which are bigger.  I once saw some, wood pigeons dressed, in Smithfield meat market in London and they still  looked very small.  

The French have Pousins (chicks) which are very small chickens. Not much meat on them.  They seem to be catching on over here, but they are expensive.

 

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I did cous cous today,  Spicy vegetable stew with Ras el Hanout* , a mixture of spices , with a lamb chop a chipolata, and a merguez. 

Very tasty,

*also Raz el Hanout.  I came across a recipe recently that had both spellings in it.

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7 hours ago, Invicta said:

I did cous cous today,  Spicy vegetable stew with Ras el Hanout* , a mixture of spices , with a lamb chop a chipolata, and a merguez. 

Very tasty,

*also Raz el Hanout.  I came across a recipe recently that had both spellings in it.

I had never heard of that, so I had to look it up. =D  Very interesting - and I read that there is another spelling as well - Rass el hanout. Apparently it means "head of the shop" and is supposed to be the best spices. 

What type of spice is it - earthy, hot, etc?

I've never had cous cous either, although I would like to try it some time.

We had hamburger gravy over biscuits. Doesn't sound anywhere near as interesting as your meal! LOL

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8 hours ago, HappyChristian said:

We had hamburger gravy over biscuits. Doesn't sound anywhere near as interesting as your meal! LOL

Any kind of gravy is the staff of life.

My dinner last night consisted of pan fried chicken livers, a huge mound of fresh broccoli, and an ear fresh corn.

I know most people don't like liver, but I like any kind of liver, especially chicken liver.

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My wife blessed me today.

When I was growing up, my mother would often make a dish that she called "Rice Stuff". I guess it could be considered a poor man's Oriental dish? It consists of ground beef, scrambled eggs, and chopped onions...all mixed in together with rice...topped off with soy sauce.

I absolutely love it! 

RICE STUFF! 

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On 12/10/2017 at 6:25 AM, HappyChristian said:

I had never heard of that, so I had to look it up. =D  Very interesting - and I read that there is another spelling as well - Rass el hanout. Apparently it means "head of the shop" and is supposed to be the best spices. 

What type of spice is it - earthy, hot, etc?

I've never had cous cous either, although I would like to try it some time.

We had hamburger gravy over biscuits. Doesn't sound anywhere near as interesting as your meal! LOL

I prefer one Ras el Hanout  that I buy in France under the brand Ducros, it is mildly hot, but I have tried other brands but they never taste the same.  Some have chili in and some don't, one I bought locally does not have chili but black pepper.  

Cous cous is a type of pasta but very small grains.  In France they sell two grades, fin (fine) and moyen (medium) we like the latter, but here. they just seem to do one grade and that is about the same as fin.  We usually try to get a day trip to France once a month for my wife to keep up her French, but is also our day out and cheaper than going to London for the day. We are about ½ way between London and Calais including the channel. I have not been too well recently so have put off going.  

Today I had lamb's liver and bacon in gravy with baby potatoes and green beans.  That is a very cheap meat and it was ½ price so even better.

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Thank you

I passed out a couple of weeks ago and since then have had dizzy spells.

Today I had Stir Fry Beef strips, with a jar of Levi Roots Caribbean Curry and pineapple chutney.with rice.  The curry was a bit tasteless but the chutney gave it some flavour.  The jar said chicken, but I had some beef in the freezer that needed to be used.

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On 13/10/2017 at 4:42 AM, No Nicolaitans said:

My wife blessed me today.

When I was growing up, my mother would often make a dish that she called "Rice Stuff". I guess it could be considered a poor man's Oriental dish? It consists of ground beef, scrambled eggs, and chopped onions...all mixed in together with rice...topped off with soy sauce.

I absolutely love it! 

RICE STUFF! 

My mother never made anything like that, the only rice she used was for milk puddings. She hated currants, vinegar, and pepper, and had no sense of smell. Her two sister had a limited or no sense of smell, She was a very fussy eater,

 When my wife introduced her to Courgettes/Zucchini she called them 'those cucumber things', when I said that they were just baby marrows and you like them, she said "They don't look like it."  The interesting thing was when we introduced her to pizza..  

Sometimes people use strange names for their dishes. French chef Paul Bocuse has Wooden Leg soup.  Welsh chef Tom Norrington-Davies has Toenail Pie and Rabbits in Jackets.

Edited by Invicta

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17 hours ago, HappyChristian said:

WHAT is toenail pie? I looked it up and couldn't find anything out about it.

We just pieced tonight. I had cereal.

It doesn't have any toenails in it any more than wooden leg soup was wooden legs in it.

I have never made it.  It is a sweet steamed pudding topped with raspberry coulis or jam and sprinkled with desiccated coconut, which resembles toenails,   

Leftover curry from  yesterday with mango chutney as I ran out of pineapple, 

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25 minutes ago, Invicta said:

It doesn't have any toenails in it any more than wooden leg soup was wooden legs in it.

I have never made it.  It is a sweet steamed pudding topped with raspberry coulis or jam and sprinkled with desiccated coconut, which resembles toenails,   

Leftover curry from  yesterday with mango chutney as I ran out of pineapple, 

Heh - I didn't figure it had toenails in it. I was wondering, though, what it was that gave the pie its name. Coconut would do that. It sounds tasty.

We are having roast again - the last one from our beef. The house smells lovely.

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http://woodenlegsoup.blogspot.co.uk/

This seems to be copied from Paul Bocuse. Word for word.  He said it was given to him by  Henry Clos-Jouve and that it has been made in Lyons  for a very long time.  The editor of my English Edition says it is delightful reading, but not to be lightly undertaken

Edited by Invicta

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50 minutes ago, Invicta said:

http://woodenlegsoup.blogspot.co.uk/

This seems to be copied from Paul Bocuse. Word for word.  He said it was given to him by  Henry Clos-Jouve and that it has been made in Lyons  for a very long time.  The editor of my English Edition says it is delightful reading, but not to be lightly undertaken

Yes, that does sound like it will feed the whole neighborhood! :1_grinning:

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Our seniors lunch today.  We had shepherds pie.  I was feeling much better and managed to serve the meals at the tables.  First time for weeks,

We went shopping after and I got some Southern fried chicken bits from the Hot Deli, and served them with left over potatoes from the lunch,  fried in a little olive oil and tossed in Persillade (Parsley, garlic and shopped shallots)

 

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I'm glad you're feeling so much better!

We are having leftover roast beef. Rather than mashed potatoes and gravy, we are roasting red potatoes. I haven't had red potatoes in a while, so I'm looking forward to it. 

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Thanks. LuAnne

I hope it lasts. 

I have got a salmon steak for lunch, and we will have steamed baby potatoes, and Extra Fine green beans and probably carrot.

I rarely buy red potatoes.  I bought some desirée potatoes years ago, and they tasted very soapy.  I never bought them again, but I have sometimes had some they call reds. One of my gardening books said potatoes can taste soapy if they have too much chemical fertiliser. 

 

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I hope you enjoyed your lunch. There was not much on your lunch list that appealed to me. I had so much salmon while I lived in Alaska that I no longer like it. I can eat it, but don't enjoy it. The green beans and carrots are two veggies that I love to hate. I guess out of your list my edible part would have been the potatoes.

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5 hours ago, Jim_Alaska said:

I hope you enjoyed your lunch. There was not much on your lunch list that appealed to me. I had so much salmon while I lived in Alaska that I no longer like it. I can eat it, but don't enjoy it. The green beans and carrots are two veggies that I love to hate. I guess out of your list my edible part would have been the potatoes.

I didn't enjoy it.  Just after I posted that, my daughter phoned to say her and her youngest were coming over, as she was going to help me to complete some forms from our lawyer to do with the sale of our house.  We did not have enough for all of us so my wife suggested Pizza, and got some out of the freezer and I was dealing with them and they were just about finished cooking when my daughter called me to answer some questions, and I forgot about the pizzas, till they were well overdone.

Had the salmon this evening with fried potatoes with garlic and parsley. 

Most salmon here is farmed in Scotland.  

Filling in forms is not my forté, I tend to put them in a file and hope they will go away.  My daughter was filling them in for over four hours and still hadn't finished when she had to leave. 

Edited by Invicta

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5 hours ago, No Nicolaitans said:

I love roasted red potatoes, drizzled with oil, and a packet of dry onion soup mix sprinkled over them. Any potato will do, but the reds are my favorite cooked that way.

Do you peel your potatoes when you roast them?  

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2 hours ago, Invicta said:

Do you peel your potatoes when you roast them?  

No sir...I just cut them into quarters (or more depending on the size of the potatoes) and go from there. I like them roughly cut up into about 3/4" to 1" pieces.

Judging by your previous post...does that mean that your house has been sold?

Edited by No Nicolaitans

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