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Ryrie Study Bible

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Posted

Does anyone here own a Ryrie Study Bible? If so, do you like it? What do you think is its pros and cons? I'm thinking of buying one and I just thought I'd ask. Thanks.

Frank. :sing:

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Posted

The Ryrie Study Bible under sin, states that sin among other things is an illusion.
II. The Definition of Sin
A. Sin Is An Illusion. This idea has taken a variety of forms of expression; e.g., our lack of knowledge is the reason we have the illusion of sin; or when evolution has had time to help us progress further, sin will disappear.
B. Sin Is that Eternal Principle of Dualism, outside of God and independent of Him.
C. Sin Is Selfishness. This is the most frequently heard definition of sin. It is scriptural but inadequate.
D. Sin Is a Violation of the Law. This too is scriptural but inadequate, unless the concept of law is expanded to include the character of God Himself.
E. Sin Is Anything Contrary to the Character of God.

Ryrie Study Bible, Moody Press, Chicago. 1986, p. 1770.

This is an unfortunate statement. In fact the next two statements about sin (B and C) under "The Definition of Sin" are also false statements. Only the last two statements (D and E) are true. The Ryrie Study Bible does not use this approach in the other sections. Under the other topics, they present only true statements. Here, they changed their presentation style - so at first it is not clear what they regard as truth.

The Ryrie Study Bible simply presented some popular ideas about sin before they presented the truth. The Biblical truth is given when the outline reaches the letters "D and E." How does the Bible define sin?

Everyone who sins breaks the law; in fact, sin is lawlessness. (NIV) 1 John 3:4

Genesis 2:16-17 is the first passage in scripture that reveals what sin really is. God warned Adam and Eve not to eat of the tree and when they did they became sinners. So sin is breaking God's laws.

This article was taken from a web site that is NOT KJB. In fact they are NKJV and NASB.

____________________________________________________

Charles Caldwell Ryrie (b. 1925) is a graduate of Haverford College (B.A.), Dallas Theological Seminary (Th.M., Th.D.) and the University of Edinburgh, Scotland (Ph.D.). For many years he served as professor of systematic theology and dean of doctoral studies at Dallas Theological Seminary, where he challenged students to precision in theological speaking and writing. Dr. Ryrie is especially gifted in his ability to clarify profound theological truths in simple, precise language. He has enabled people to understand biblical truth that they would otherwise not readily comprehend and in this he has made an inestimable contribution to the Christian world.

Dr. Ryrie's writings have consistently been on the theological cutting edge, addressing the critical issues of the day and speaking on behalf of dispensational premillennialism. In his classic text, Dispensationalism Today (1965), and his recent update, Dispensationalism (1995), Ryrie clarifies many of the misunderstandings that opponents of premillennialism and dispensationalism have leveled. He notes that even Louis Berkhof, a covenant theologian, makes (dispensational) distinctions, differentiating the OT from the NT and seeing four subdivisions in the OT. Ryrie defines a dispensation as "a distinguishable economy in the outworking of God's purpose" (Dispensationalism, 28). In a dispensation God places people under a stewardship or responsibility, people invariably failing the test, with a corresponding judgment and change.

Ryrie clearly delineates the sine qua non of dispensationalism:

1. 1. Dispensationalism keeps Israel and the church distinct. This is the most basic test of dispensationalism.

2. 2. The distinction between Israel and the church is born out of a system of hermeneutics that is usually called literal interpretation. Dispensationalism interprets words in their normal or plain meaning; it does not spiritualize or allegorize the text. The strength of dispensationalism is its consistently literal, or plain, interpretation of Scripture.

3. 3. The underlying purpose of God in the world is the glory of God (pp. 39-40). In contrast to covenant theology (which sees salvation as the underlying purpose) and progressive dispensationalism (which emphasizes a Christological center), dispensationalism sees a broader purpose

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Posted

Dan,
Have a few books by Charles Ryrie and his study Bible is the one I have used for years. How ever most of my Bibles don't have notes but are filled with my notes.
On Sin from hearing him speak is Sin Is Anything Contrary to the Character of God and most sins are mental attitude. Everytrhing we do that isn't to the glory of God is sin is one way I think he puts it. He has said most sins start with pride. He isn't for or against women wearing pants and in a lot of IFB Churches that would be called sin, he does not call that sin, and the list goes on and on. He isn't KJ's only, but his writting are very good or I think they are.

I agree that anything that is contrary to the charater of God is sin and they would cover all sin, or that is the way I see it. God wouldn't sin so any sin is contrary ti His charater.

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Posted

[quote="Bob"]
Dan,
However most of my Bibles don't have notes but are filled with my notes.
[/quote]

Amen to that. I think that notes from yourself are the best kind. :)

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Posted

Dan,
Does this mean that you would or would not recommend the Ryrie Study Bible :?:

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Posted

Like I said, I never heard of this guy. The articles I posted above I found doing a Google search. If I had to base my decision only on these articles I would have to say I would probably not use it. But this is very, very limited research on him.

Quote "The Ryrie Study Bible under sin, states that sin among other things is an illusion"

I have no idea where the definitions for A, B, and C came from but I can say that they are not Biblical.

I only spent about an hour researching Ryrie. I would recommend that you spend several days or more, if necessary, to find out more on him. Use Google, Yahoo, or any of the other search engines to see what is said about him.

This has more than likely not been much help for you. Sorry. I didn't have the time to look up more on him. :)

Remember, when using a "study bible" you are getting the opinions and comments of an individual. Make sure the person is docternaly sound and does not contradict what the Bible says.

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Posted

Hey

I had a ryrie study bible and liked it very much. You will find error in his teaching but you will find that in all commentaries. I found that most commentators will take the middle of the road on issues like predestination etc. I also like Dr. J Vernon MacGee.

If it was me, I would buy a separate commentary and a wide margin bible and then you can make your own notes in your bible and use the commentary as a study help. Keep asking around and research all of them.

Tim

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Posted

I have a Ryrie Study Bible that I use from time to time. I would compare it to a Scofield Study Bible in that there is some useful information in them but they are WH text followers and their view of the church makes the refuting of the ecumenical movement an impossible case.

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Posted

I have a ryrie study bible and that plus my Thompson Chain are my main study bibles I enjoy them very much

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Posted

Ryrie is my favorite study bible though I like it more for the type face then for the notes. I also have a KJV Study Bible by Zondervan which has the notes from the NIV Study Bible with the KJV text and a Classic Note Bible that I use for my sermon outlines.

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Posted

My father said he has one at our house in SC, and that its notes are strongly dispensational......

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Posted

I have never owned one, but a good pastor friend loves his. As stated in another thread, you just have to take what is said in the man-written section of any study Bible and compare it to what Scripture is saying.

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Posted

I own a ryrie and I love it. As with any commentaries you have to be careful, because it is man't interpretation.

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